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Cholamandal Artists’ Village
Cholamandal Artists’ Village

Cholamandal Artists’ Village

East Coast Road, Near Spencers Daily Injambakkam, Thiruvanmiyur, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India, 600115

The Basics

Starting in the 1950s, Cholamandal Artists’ Village played a fundamental role in the Madras art movement, which helped bring the modernist movement to South India. Today, the village’s resident artists all help maintain galleries, a performance space, and an intimate café. For collectors of modern art, there are few better places in India to buy pieces directly from the artists who made them. Visit the village independently or as part of a guided tour that also includes other Chennai museums, such as the Government Museum and the Chennai Rail Museum.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Cholamandal Artists’ Village is a must-see for anyone with an interest in the fine arts.

  • On-site facilities include a bookshop, a craft shop, and a small café.

  • Photography is allowed.

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How to Get There

Cholamandal Artists’ Village is located right by the sea, off Golden Beach in the southern part of town. It’s about 7.5 miles (12 kilometers) south of Elliot's Beach and 2 miles (3.2 kilometers) north of the International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON) Temple. If you’re not visiting as part of an organized tour, it's easiest to get here by taxi, though it’s also possible to take a train from central Chennai to Velachery or Perungudi and take a taxi the remaining 6 miles (10 kilometers).

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When to Get There

Cholamandal Artists’ Village is open daily from 9:30am to 6:30pm, including during public holidays. Crowds are not usually an issue here, and while there’s no bad time to visit, temperatures tend to be cooler earlier in the morning. Call ahead for updates on special events or closures.

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K.C.S. Paniker

Cholamandal Artists’ Village was founded by the painter K.C.S. Paniker, who is well-known in Tamil Nadu for his abstract works with metaphysical themes. He's considered the father of the Madras art movement, which popularized India’s own brand of modernism during an era when European influences dominated both on the subcontinent and globally.

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