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Things to Do in Germany

Germany offers a path for every kind of traveler, whether it leads toward the castles of Neuschwanstein and Linderhof, a glass of local wine in Rhine Valley, or across to Austria's Salzburg Lake District, an area synonymous with the Von Trapp family and The Sound of Music. For history buffs, stories of the Cold War abound in Berlin, and day trips to World War II memorial sites offer a somber and significant look at the past. If you find yourself in Munich in the fall it can only mean one thing: a stop at Oktoberfest, the world’s largest beer festival, for a taste of Bavarian brews, culture, and food.
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Oberbaum Bridge (Oberbaumbrücke)
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25 Tours and Activities

The Oberbaum Bridge, or Oberbaumbrücke in German, was built in the late 1800s and crosses the River Spree to connect the neighborhoods of Kreuzberg and Friedrichshain in Berlin. The bridge has mock medieval turrets and seven arches. It's a two level bridge with the lower level for cars and the upper level for the U1 U-bahn trains.

During the Cold War, this bridge was a landmark dividing East Berlin from West Berlin. Armed guards patrolled the banks of the river, and the bridge was one of the crossing points from west to east only. The U-bahn line that crossed the bridge had to terminate at an earlier stop, but a few years after reunification, the train was reconnected and once again went across the bridge. Today the bridge is decorated with street art and graffiti. There is a nearby beach on the banks of the river, which used to be no man's land blocked by barbed wire. Also near the bridge is the famous East Side Gallery.

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Marienplatz
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Marienplatz serves as Munich's city center with a variety of historic town hall structures and shopping markets. At the center of the square, the Mariensaule, the column of St. Mary, exhibits a statue of the Virgin Mary and the "four putti" symbolizing the city's triumph over war, pestilence, famine, and heresy. Visitors flock to Marienplatz at 11 am, 12 noon, and 5 pm each day to watch the famous animated Glockenspiel (carillon) in the New Town Hall made of 43 bells and 32 figures. The best views of the show can be found on the top floor of the Hugendubel bookstore and the Cafe Glockenspeil.
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Hard Rock Cafe Munich
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Munich’s Hard Rock Café was the second to open in Germany, and the 3,000-square-foot space has hosting late night parties and live concerts with enough seating for hundreds of guests, plus plenty of standing room, since 2002.

The cafe mixes typical Bavarian elements with its modern decor and light installations. The Munich location has more than 150 exhibits on music history in its memorabilia collection, which features local artists, as well as international celebrities like Madonna and Freddie Mercury.

Along with classic American dishes like spare ribs and the famous Legendary Burgers, guests can also order dishes like the Hard Rock Pizza. Bavarian variations on certain dishes can also be found on the menu, such as in the Obatzda Burger, which is topped with Bavarian cream cheese. In addition to food, guests can enjoy a wide variety of cocktails.
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Odeonsplatz
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Located at the western entrance to the exquisite Hofgarten gardens, the Odeonsplatz is one of central Munich’s largest public squares, notable for its distinct Italian-style architecture. Taking its name from the 19th century Odeon Concert Hall that once stood at the head of the square (the remains of the building now form part of a government office block), the space still retains its creative streak, hosting a number of annual concerts, parades and city celebrations. At the top of the list is the Odeonsplatz Classical Evening, a grand open-air event held each July and drawing crowds of over 16,000 to watch performances by the prestigious Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra and other world renowned classical acts.

Even if you don’t catch the square at its most atmospheric, the Odeonsplatz still offers a dramatic starting point to city walking tours.

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Reichstag
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Topped with an acclaimed glass dome designed by British architect Norman Foster, the Reichstag parliamentary building is home to Germany’s Parliament, the Bundestag.

The classically pedimented and columned building was built in the 1890s, and seriously damaged by fire in 1933 and subsequent air raids. In the 1990s the building was restored to host the parliament of the newly reunified Germany.

Visitors can step inside the multi-tiered glass dome and onto the roof terrace for 360 degree views of Berlin’s government district and the Tiergarten.

Take an audioguide tour to learn about the parliamentary goings on in the Bundestag and the history of the famous building. After taking a stroll, relax in the rooftop restaurant.

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Berlin TV Tower (Berliner Fernsehturm)
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The Berlin Television Tower,or the Berliner Fernsehturm is the city’s tallest structure at 368 metres high. It was inaugurated on 3 October 1969 just before the 20th anniversary of the German Democratic Republic (GDR). For Walter Ulbricht, who was the State Council Chairman of the GDR at the time, it was one of the most important symbols demonstrating the superiority of socialist societies. The construction of the Berlin Television Tower illustrated that a better future was being built in East Berlin.

With over 1.2 million visitors a year, come early to beat the lines to go up the tower at the panorama level at 203 metres. This point offers one of the best views of Berlin on a clear day. You can look for your favourite Berlin landmarks here or at the upstairs rotating cafe, which makes one revolution every 30 minutes.

VIP ticket holders can visit at any time without waiting in line and are guaranteed the next available free seat in the Tower’s restaurant.

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Berlin Victory Column (Siegessäule)
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Standing 67 meters (220 feet) high and topped with a 35-tonne gilded figure of Victoria – the Roman goddess of victory in battle – the Berlin Victory Column was inaugurated in 1873 to commemorate Germany’s (or Prussia, as it was called then) victory over Denmark in the Danish-Prussian War of 1864. Lovingly nicknamed ‘Golden Lizzie’ by Berlin locals, the sandstone memorial was designed by German architect Heinrich Strack and sits on a red granite base adorned with columns; it originally stood in Königsplatz, which is today’s Platz der Republik. In the run up to World War II, the column was moved to the center of the Tiergarten park as part of Hitler’s plan to rebuild Berlin as the grandiose capital city of the Third Reich.

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Victuals Market (Viktualienmarkt)
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Where can you find the best gourmet Bavarian delights? Munich's Victuals Market, Viktualienmarkt in German, is the place to find exotic fruits, fresh vegetables, artisan cheeses, delicious hams, honey, and truffles.

Many of the market stalls in the Viktualienmarkt have been family-run for generations, and although the gourmet food featured here also means gourmet prices, you would be hard pressed to find better quality culinary delicacies. While in Munich, the Viktualienmarkt is the best place to shop for delicious Bavarian food to make for a picnic lunch at a nearby park.

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English Garden (Englischer Garten)
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The Englischer Garten, German for "English Garden", is one of the world's largest urban parks - even larger than New York's Central Park. Named for the English style of landscape gardening, the park is popular with locals and visitors alike who come to lounge on the meadow grass, cycle the winding paths, or even surf the man-made waterfall created by a bridge over the Eisbach stream on Prinzregent Strasse. The English weren't the only ones to have an influence in Munich's park, the Japanese Teahouse and Chinese Tower are also popular attractions in the Englischer Garten. Have a bratwurst and a beer at the Biergarten at the foot of the Chinese Tower while listening to traditional German music played by men in Liederhosen. There is another Biergarten located in the park, Seehaus, where you can also rent a paddle boat and take a spin around the lake on warmer days.
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More Things to Do in Germany

St. Peter's Church (Peterskirche)

St. Peter's Church (Peterskirche)

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The oldest church in Munich, St. Peter's Church, or Peterskirche, is a Roman Catholic establishment built in the 12th century in the Bavarian Romanesque style. The interior of the church features the magnificent Mariahilf-Altar, Gothic paintings & sculptures, and a ceiling fresco. But even these beautiful works of art can't top the bizarre gem-studded skeleton of St. Mundita, who stares at visitors with false eyes and jewelled teeth.

From the spire of "Old Peter", as the church is known to the locals, are spectacular views of the oldest part of Munich. Remember to check the colored rings at the bottom, a white ring means the Alps are visible, making the hike to the top even more worthwhile. Although the spire was almost completely destroyed during World War II, it was fully restored with the traditional architecture.

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Eisbach Wave (Eisbachwelle)

Eisbach Wave (Eisbachwelle)

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When thinking of places to go surfing, Germany's landlocked city of Munich is probably not the first to come to mind. But interestingly enough, surfers have been riding the waves in the city's Isar River since the 1970s.

A man-made arm of the Isar, the Eisbach (German for 'ice brook') flows for 1.25 miles (2 km) through a large city park known as the English Garden (Englischer Garten). Just past the bridge near the House of the Arts (Haus der Kunst) art museum, the Eisbach forms a standing wave of over three feet (1 meter). Surfers have rigged the wave by building a system of ropes and planks to channel it into something so surfable, it's home to an annual surfing competition and has hosted world-class surf legends such as Kelly Slater and Jack Johnson. Travelers visiting in summer can see surfers queued up waiting patiently for their turn to shred.

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Berlin Cathedral (Berliner Dom)

Berlin Cathedral (Berliner Dom)

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With its many green domes, the baroque Berlin Cathedral (Berliner Dom) is the city’s largest church. The classical building was built in the mid-1700s, and was extensively restored following bombing during World War II.

Audioguide tours provide in-depth information about the building’s history and artworks. Highlights include the Hohenzollern Crypt, with its royal tombs, and the monumental pipe organ. The centerpiece of the building is the soaring dome, with its stained glass and mosaics. The original dome was destroyed by Allied bombs, and its restoration was particularly painstaking.

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Museum Island (Museumsinsel)

Museum Island (Museumsinsel)

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Located on the northern tip of Spree Island, Berlin’s Museumsinsel (Museum Island) is an ensemble of five world-renowned museums. In 1830, King Friedrich Wilhelm III commissioned the construction of the Royal Museum - now the Altes Museum - to allow the general public to view the royal art treasures of Germany. The idea for the island was devised in 1841, when Friedrich August Stuler wanted to create a cultural center, which later became Museum Island.

Almost 70% of the buildings were destroyed during World War II, where the collections were divided between East and West Berlin. Since 1999, the museum has been the only architectural and cultural ensemble that was honored world heritage status by UNESCO.

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King's Square (Königsplatz)

King's Square (Königsplatz)

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Königsplatz was initially built to serve the urban notions of King Ludwig I, who wished to integrate culture, administration, Christianity and Bavarian military in one massive green space. The king opted for a European Neoclassic style based on the Acropolis in Athens. He even had two museums built in the same style; first was the Glyptothek, where he could house his sprawling collection of Greek and Roman sculptures, and second, the Bavarian State Collection of Antiques, which contains Greek, Etruscan and Roman artifacts. King Ludwig I also commissioned the Propylaea, an imposing and austere gate which served as a memorial to his son, the Bavarian prince Otto of Greece.

Despite this architectural and urban prowess, the square is now infamous for being the place where the Nazi party held marches and mass rallies during the Holocaust. In fact, the national headquarters of the Nazi party, the Brown House, was located on Brienner Straße just off the square.

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Reeperbahn & St Pauli District

Reeperbahn & St Pauli District

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Hamburg’s alter ego is raffish St. Pauli and the Reeperbahn, forever synonymous with strip clubs and the Beatles.

The city’s red light district, the Reeperbahn is a pedestrianised street lined with clubs, brothels and sex shops. Its proximity to the port has attracted sailors for centuries, while more recently the Beatles cut their musical teeth playing the seedy clubs here back in the early 1960s.

The scene is still in-your-face but a little less brutal these days, and up-market restaurants and theaters hosting shows like Cats and the Lion King rub shoulders with the less family-friendly forms of entertainment.

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Beatles-Platz

Beatles-Platz

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The city of Hamburg played a big part in Beatles history. The famous band made it big in Hamburg and spent their early days playing at a variety of clubs in Hamburg's St. Pauli neighborhood. In 2001 a radio program manager proposed the idea of having a square to honor the band's importance in Hamburg's history. Beatles Platz was finally finished in 2008.

The square has five metal silhouette statues to represent each musician who was at one point a member of the band: John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Stuart Sutcliffe, Ringo Starr, and Pete Best. The drummer statue represents both Ringo Starr and Pete Best, who was the drummer before Ringo. Visitors often stand in the life-sized silhouettes and pretend they are part of the band. The square is actually circular with a 95-foot diameter and was paved black to look like a vinyl record. There are also steel bands with the names of around 70 Beatles songs engraved on them.

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Beer and Oktoberfest Museum

Beer and Oktoberfest Museum

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Housed in the oldest town house in Munich, the Beer and Oktoberfest Museum features permanent exhibitions on topics ranging from the history of beer to the Bavarian monks’ purity laws and the unique quality of Munich’s beer. As for the story of Oktoberfest, on the upper floor of the museum you’ll learn about its beginnings as a national festival for the 1810 wedding of King Luis to Princess Teresa, right through to today’s celebration — it’s the largest beer festival in the world attended by some 6 million people every year.

You’ll see photos and illustrations, exhibits of brewery and beer-related memorabilia, including original beer mugs from the early years of Oktoberfest. A 12-minute documentary on the evolution of Bavarian beer-making also plays in the small cinema. And as you make your way round the exhibits, check out the building’s original wooden beam and restored murals — they date all the way back to 1340.

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Neues Museum (New Museum)

Neues Museum (New Museum)

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The Neues Museum was built in the mid-1800s and was heavily damaged during World War II. Restoration work beginning in 2005 carefully preserved the facade and interior, while incorporating damage from war into the design, rather than covering it up. The museum opened its doors to the public again in 2009.

The Egyptian collection includes displays covering more than 4,000 years of ancient Egyptian and Nubian cultures. There are exhibits on the history of the collection and Egyptology itself, portraits of kings and the Berlin Green Head, which illustrates how sculpture progressed as an art form. Three chambers contain offerings dating from the Old Kingdom, as well as displays of tomb architecture and relief art. There is also an Egyptian library of antiquity and a section depicting ancient everyday life, the afterlife and the cult of the gods.

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Checkpoint Charlie

Checkpoint Charlie

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"You are leaving the American sector."

Memorialized in film and print, Checkpoint Charlie is the most famous symbol of Cold War era Berlin.

Marking the border crossing between the American Sector (Kreuzberg) and East Berlin (Mitte), only allied personnel and foreign visitors could pass through the checkpoint. Checkpoint Charlie was the most famous security point in the Berlin Wall, but for most of its life it was little more than a wooden shack and boom gates. Today a replica shed stands in the middle of Friedrichstraße.

While you’re here, drop into the Mauer Museum (Haus am Checkpoint Charlie) to learn about the history of Checkpoint Charlie, and the audacious and often tragic attempts made by East Berliners to escape from East to West.

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Pergamon Museum (Pergamonmuseum)

Pergamon Museum (Pergamonmuseum)

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Antique art from the Middle East and Turkey is featured at Berlin’s important Pergamon Museum. In terms of 'wow factor' the collection is matched only by the British Museum. The highlights are the monumental exhibits from the Roman era, in particular the massive Pergamon Altar from the 2nd century BC and the Market Gate of Miletus. Fabulous examples from the art of the Near East include the famous Ishtar Gate from ancient Babylon, and the lovely tiled lions from the Processional Way. You’ll also see intricate gold jewelry, pottery, mosaics and other artworks. Temporary exhibitions explore such topics as miniatures, Islamic art and historic collectors of classical antiquities.
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Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe (Holocaust Memorial)

Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe (Holocaust Memorial)

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The Holocaust Memorial, also known as The Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, is an urban tribute to remember and honor up to six million Jewish victims of the Holocaust. Located within walking distance between the Brandenburg Gate and Potsdamer Platz, the Memorial consists of the Field of Stelae designed by Peter Eisenman and the underground Information Center. Eisenmann set up 2,711 concrete pillars - so-called stelaes - of varying heights to create a grid-like structure that can be approached from all angles. You can feel the unmarked and harrowed suffering as you walk through the pillars that rise as you continue through them. The underground and modern information center complements the outdoor memorial, where visitors can learn more about the victims of the Holocaust and deepen understanding about this tragedy.
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Gendarmenmarkt

Gendarmenmarkt

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Located in the Mitte district, the Gendarmenmarkt has gone through a few name changes. After being used from 1736 to 1782 by the military for sentry duty and housing their horses, it was known as the Gendarmenmarkt. After being damaged in the war, the square was renamed “Platz der Akademie” in 1950 in honor of the 250th anniversary of the Academy of Science. In 1991, it got its original name back.

The Gendarmenmarkt is arguably Berlin’s most magnificent square. It is best known for the triple architectural force composed of the German and French cathedrals (Deutscher und Französischer Dom) and Schinkel’s Konzerthaus (concert hall). The ‘domes’ refer to the domed tower structures erected in 1785 by architect Carl von Gontard were mainly intended to add stature and grandeur to the two buildings. Some of the most high-end restaurants, businesses and hotels are located around the Gendarmenmarkt, especially around the streets of Charlottenstrasse.

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Brandenburg Gate (Brandenburger Tor)

Brandenburg Gate (Brandenburger Tor)

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The Brandenburg Gate (or Brandenburger Tor) is one of Berlin’s original city gates, erected in 1791. It marks the entry to the Under den Linden avenue as part of the ceremonial boulevard that led to the Prussian monarchs’ royal seat.

The classical monument is topped by a chariot driven by a winged goddess, which was briefly carted off to Paris by Napoleon as booty.

During the Cold War, the Brandenburg Gate could not be accessed from East or West Germany, making it a particularly poignant symbol after reunification.

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