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Casa Fernando Pessoa
Casa Fernando Pessoa

Casa Fernando Pessoa

Rua Coelho da Rocha 16, Lisbon, Beiras

The Basics

Casa Fernando Pessoa provides an intimate look at this great 20th-century writer and subjects related to him. You can learn more about Pessoa, and his many heteronyms, as you tour both the public and private libraries. The house’s cultural center also hosts a number of workshops, lectures, poetry recitals, and temporary art exhibits.

The museum is generally a part of some of Lisbon’s off-the-beaten-track tours for those who want to delve deep into Portuguese history and culture.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Casa Fernando Pessoa is a must-visit for literature lovers and those interested in lesser-known activities in Lisbon.

  • Visitors tend to spend about two hours exploring the house before heading to Lisbon’s other western neighborhoods or back to the city center.

  • Flagrante Delitro, a restaurant serving Portuguese fare, is located in the museum’s glass extension.

  • The house is accessible to wheelchair users. There is an entrance ramp on the left side of the building.

  • Those who are hearing or visually impaired can enjoy the museum with audio descriptions, videos with Portuguese Sign Language, and braille.

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How to Get There

Casa Fernando Pessoa is located in Lisbon’s Campo de Ourique neighborhood, in the north of the city. Take the yellow metro line to the Rato station, about a 15-minute walk away. Alternatively, take tram 25 or 28, or city bus 720 or 738, to the museum.

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Trip ideas

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When to Get There

The house museum is still an unknown treasure in Lisbon and does not see too many visitors; most arrive in the morning. Guided tours are available in English at 11:30am on Monday, Friday, and Saturday for a small fee.

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Fernando Pessoa’s Heteronyms

Fernando Pessoa led a very interesting life during his 47-year existence. He took on many jobs throughout his lifetime, which led him to write under a number of pseudonyms. However, Pessoa called these names heteronyms rather than pseudonyms because he felt the latter term did not capture the independent and intellectual life of each name. Over the course of his life, he wrote—mostly in Portuguese but in English and French as well—under approximately 75 names.

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