Recent Searches
Clear

Travel update: We’re doing our best to help keep you safe and your plans flexible. Learn more.

Read More

Things to Do in Malta

An archipelago nestled between Sicily and Tunisia in the center of the Mediterranean; the Maltese Islands are a tapestry of Italian, African, and Middle Eastern traditions and culture. Malta’s UNESCO-listed capital of Valletta hosts the opulent Grandmaster’s Palace, seat of the Maltese government, and lends itself well to walking tours. Travelers looking for a more active vacation might head to Gozo for hiking tours, beach trips, scuba diving, and guided visits to Neolithic ruins. The Blue Lagoon, situated off the coast of the small island of Comino, makes for a popular day trip, as does the walled city of Mdina, which Game of Thrones fans will recognize as King’s Landing.
Read More
Category

Upper Barrakka Gardens
34 Tours and Activities

These beautifully landscaped gardens complete with follies, a statue of Sir Winston Churchill, a café and benches under shady trees, were created in 1775 on a bastion at the highest point on Valletta’s fortifications. Originally the private property of the Italian members of the Knight of St John, they are twinned with Lower Barrakka Gardens (currently under renovation but with views over the Siege Memorial) on Barriera Wharf. From their position on the south side of the city walls, the gardens provide the perfect vantage point for views over the Three Cities of Vittoriosa, Senglea and Cospicua, including views across the Grand Harbour.

Take an afternoon stroll around the walls of Valletta before catching the new elevator, which ascends in seconds to the gardens, to watch the sunset before returning to waterfront with choices of quality bars and restaurants.

Read More
Valletta Waterfront (Pinto Wharf)
star-5
38
29 Tours and Activities

The carefully restored Valletta Waterfront sits on the Grand Harbour, below the fortified city and opposite the Three Cities of Vittorioso, Senglea, and Cospicua. Once a series of 19 Baroque bonding warehouses, it is now a leisure complex for locals, tourists, and an annual influx of half a million cruise passengers. The original buildings were commissioned by Manuel Pinto da Fonseca, the Portuguese Grand Master of the Knights of St John between 1741–73 who was also responsible for the Auberge de Castille, one of the most impressive buildings in Valletta and the present offices of the Prime Minister.

Whether you are looking for gourmet restaurants, high-end stores, local events, or simply a breathtaking walk along the promenade, the Valletta Waterfront has it all. Shopping at the Forni Shopping Complex is duty-free at stores selling Maltese glassware and local filigree jewelry and with a choice of 12 restaurants, bars, and clubs, the Waterfront is always jumping at night.

Read More
St. John's Co-Cathedral (Kon-Katidral ta' San Gwann)
star-5
9
28 Tours and Activities

Behind the misleadingly plain Baroque façade of St John's Co-Cathedral hides one of Europe's most spectacular churches, built in thanks by the Knights of St John following their successful routing of the Ottoman Turks in 1565’s Great Siege of Malta. Completed in 1577, most of the design is by Gerolamo Cassar, the Maltese architect who also built the Grand Master's Palace. The entire floor in the nave of Valletta's premier cathedral is composed of around 400 marble tombstones dedicated to prominent Knights of St John. These multicolored and highly decorative memorials pay tribute to the bravery of the order, featuring coats of arms, angels and skulls.

The heavily ornamental cathedral ceiling is covered in scenes from the life of John the Baptist, patron saint of the knights, as well as other Biblical scenes executed chiefly by Calabrian artist Mattia Preti under the patronage of the order’s early 17th-century grandmaster Raphael Cotoner.

Read More
Grandmaster's Palace
12 Tours and Activities

After their eventual triumph in the Great Siege of Malta in 1565, the Knights of St John, the quasi-military force who repelled the Turkish invaders, became the toast of a grateful Europe. The fortress of the magnificent Grand Master's Palace in Valletta reflects their heroic standing and celebrates the wealth lavished upon them. It was to become the home of the supreme head of the Knights of St John and was constructed by Gerolamo Cassar, the Maltese architect who worked on the grid-like construction of the city of Valletta (so-called in honor of Grand Master Jean Parisot de La Vallette) in 1571 to 1575, as well as the ornate ceilings of St John's Co-Cathedral.

Today the palace shares its space with the President's Palace and parliamentary offices, as well as the Grand Armoury in the lower floors of the building which houses one of the world’s finest collections of 16th- and 17th-century armor made for Knights of St John.

Read More
Auberge de Castille
star-5
38
7 Tours and Activities

Designed by Maltese architect Girolamo Cassar in the mid-16th century and later extensively remodeled under Grand Master Manuel Pinto da Fonseca – who also commissioned the original warehouses that now form Valletta Waterfront – the Auberge de Castille has pride of place at Valletta’s highest spot and owns one of the most strikingly ornate Baroque façades in the city. It was built for the powerful Spanish and Portuguese members of the Knights of St John when they were constructing the fortified city of Valletta; it was customary to have separate lodging for each nationality within the order.

Read More
Great Siege of Malta & the Knights of St. John
star-5
14
3 Tours and Activities

This walk-through, multi-media exhibition with plenty of sound effects and flashing lights focuses on the epic events of the Great Siege of Malta of 1565, in which the Turks were defeated by the Knights of St John. It also looks back on the history of the Knights, from their formation in the 12th century and their original role in tending to the pilgrims en route to the Holy Land to their reinvention as the quasi-military force who repelled the Turkish invaders. The story of Malta’s great victory is told in a series of period dioramas through the words of Francesco Balbi, a Spanish poet who was eyewitness to the breaking of the Great Siege.

The exhibition provides a great introduction to the events that marked so much of Malta’s tumultuous history and there are plenty of gory recreations of battle scenes from the 1565 siege, which kids will particularly appreciate.

Read More
Fort St. Elmo & the National War Museum
star-5
38
6 Tours and Activities

By the mid-16th century, Malta was the headquarters of the Knights of St John, a quasi-military order that became the scourge of the Turkish Ottoman Empire as formidable seafarers. The otherwise unremarkable star-shaped Fort St Elmo at the tip of Valletta's old town, guarding both Marsamxett and Grand Harbour, took its place in history during the 31-day Great Siege of Malta in 1565, which saw the deaths of 1,500 Knights of St John at the hands of the Turkish invaders, with 8,000 Ottoman warriors killed in the process. Although this battle was lost, the heroic stand of the knights enabled them to win in the end.

Although it is always possible to walk around the exterior and admire the sturdy bastions and defensive walls, guided tours focusing on key points of the siege are also sometimes available. In the interior, Fort St Elmo houses Valletta's National War Museum, where travelers can take a look at a special collection of 20th-century World War memorabilia.

Read More
Grand Harbour
star-5
38
4 Tours and Activities

Sited in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, Malta has always had extreme commercial and political significance; a fact reflected in the island’s long and tumultuous history. Valletta’s Grand Harbour has also played a huge part in this history as the biggest and certainly the most dramatic natural harbor in the Med. In use since the Phoenician era and heavily fortified since medieval times, it’s the place where much of Malta’s seafaring tradition and military successes have been played out over the centuries. The Great Siege of 1565 and the relentless bombing during WWII both took their toll here; the former on the occupying Knights of St John and the latter on Allied troops and the people of Valletta ¬– the whole island was awarded the George Cross in 1942 for valor in the face of Nazi attack.

Read More
Three Cities
4 Tours and Activities

Facing Valletta on the southeast side of the Grand Harbour are three historic cities, Vittoriosa, Senglea and Cospicua, which were originally enclosed by a giant line of fortification constructed by the Knights of St John in the 16th century. These dockside neighborhoods are where the knights were based in their auberges from 1530 until 1570. These were lodgings for the knights, organized by nationality, each with accommodation, with chapels and dining rooms all set around a courtyard. In 1570 the Knights moved across the Grand Harbour to the newly constructed city of Valletta. Although Senglea and Cospicua today have photogenic waterfronts to explore, and a marina full of expensive yachts at Senglea, Vittoriosa is the architectural masterpiece of the three cities.

Read More

More Things to Do in Malta

Malta 5D

Malta 5D

3 Tours and Activities
Learn More
Casa Rocca Piccola

Casa Rocca Piccola

star-4.5
5
3 Tours and Activities

This miniature stately home was built in the 1680s for a Knight of St John and has subsequently been occupied by many aristocratic Maltese families. Today it is open daily for guided tours that showcase both the architectural development of the mansion and the archive of fabulous wealth held by the current owner, the Marquis de Piro. In addition to the wonderful collection of 18th- and 19th-century costumes, the 50-room (around 12 are open to the public) palace contains priceless silverware, great paintings and antique furniture alongside private photos and other signs of family life.

The interior of the palace is surprisingly light and airy; a tour includes the Palladian family chapel, an Art Nouveau dining room laid out for a banquet with marble floors, bedrooms with carved four-poster beds and a series of themed rooms exhibiting porcelain and major artworks.

Learn More
Ggantija Temples

Ggantija Temples

star-3.5
8
16 Tours and Activities
Learn More
Senglea

Senglea

6 Tours and Activities
Learn More
Mdina

Mdina

star-3.5
70
48 Tours and Activities

The tiny walled, hilltop settlement of Mdina traces its history back 4,000 years and it was just outside the city that St Paul took refuge in a cave when he was shipwrecked on Malta in 60 AD. The town was once Malta’s capital and is crammed with glorious golden-stoned mansions built for the aristocracy in the 15th and 16th centuries. Chief among these is the grand Palazzo Falson, with a series of elegant rooms clustered around a central courtyard in typical medieval Spanish style and a charming little museum full of eccentric bygones.

Among its tangle of cobbled streets and splendid medieval architecture, Mdina’s pride and joy is massive St Paul’s Cathedral, designed by Maltese architect Lorenzo Gafa and completed in 1702 in an exuberant Baroque style similar to Valletta’s St John’s Co-Cathedral. The interior features a nave covered with marble tomb slabs of the rich and famous and the vaulted ceiling is covered with frescoes from St Paul’s life.

Learn More
San Anton Gardens

San Anton Gardens

9 Tours and Activities

San Anton Gardens are the most beautiful of the few public parks in Malta. They surround an ornate palazzo built by Grand Master of the Knights of St John, Antoine de Paule, as his summer residence in 1636 – it’s now the official residence of the Maltese President – and were bequeathed to the public in 1882.

A sweet-smelling citrus orchard lies at the heart of the walled gardens, a tranquil haven in the middle of busy Attard. They are landscaped in a formal Italianate fashion, dotted with elaborate follies, sculptures and fountains, dissected by shady paved walkways giving shelter from the mid-summer sun. Some of the trees here are more than 300 years old and the twisted trunks of ancient jacarandas, cypresses and Norfolk pines line the paths, palm trees soar upwards and flowerbeds blaze with color all year around.

Learn More
Ta’ Qali Crafts Village

Ta’ Qali Crafts Village

24 Tours and Activities

Situated on an abandoned WW2 airfield, Ta’Quali occupies a series of seemingly ramshackle Nissan huts – plans to spruce up Ta’Quali rear their heads from time to time, but so far no funding has been raised for the redevelopment. Don’t be put off by their tattiness as they hide the best selection of authentic Maltese crafts found on the island.

This is the place to find delicate filigree silverware, handmade lace, hand-blown glass, leather, linen and cheery painted ceramics, all created by local artisans. Expect to pay a little more for your purchases, but be happy in the knowledge that you are buying a genuine piece of Maltese treasure. Even if you don’t buy, there’s the chance to watch skilled craftsmen at work in their stores.

Learn More
Mosta Dome

Mosta Dome

23 Tours and Activities

Malta is famous for the lavish scale of its many scores of churches (there are 25 in Valletta alone) but Mosta’s Neo-classical parish church of St Mary stands out even among all this grandeur. Its eponymous, self-supporting dome measures 121 ft (37 m) in diameter and is 220 ft (67 m) high – bigger than St Paul’s in London – with every inch of the interior covered in gilt, frescoes and marble flooring. The church was designed by Maltese architect Giorgio Grognet de Vassé in the style of the Pantheon in Rome but built by solely by local parishioners and volunteers between 1833 and 1860.

The interior houses Malta’s biggest, most flamboyant organ, with 2,000 pipes, but the church is better known for a miraculous escape the congregation had in 1942 during WW2. On Sunday, April 9 the church was packed with 300 worshippers when three Luftwaffe bombs hit the dome. Two bounced off but one crashed through into the nave; amazingly it failed to explode, saving scores of lives.

Learn More