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Things to Do in Maui - page 2

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Kaumahina State Wayside Park
13 Tours and Activities

This 7.8-acre park is a popular stop along the Road to Hana, with several hiking trails, covered picnic facilities and scenic views of the coast. There are dozens of native Hawaiian plants and birds to see as you walk through the forested area, so take a break from the drive and get some perspective from an overlook of the Ke’anae Peninsula and the nearby village.

There are several scenic spots to catch views of the bright blue sea and the winding coastline. Trails lead down to the ocean and loop back around, so there’s space to stretch your legs while enjoying the tropical environment here. Bring your walking shoes, your camera or binoculars and a picnic to enjoy some time at this park on your way up to Hana.

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Maui Ocean Center
4 Tours and Activities

When you can't get enough of sea life in the waters around Maui, then head for the Maui Ocean Center in the town of Wailuku.

Opened in 1998, Maui Ocean Center is an aquarium featuring only sea life that lives around the Hawaiian islands. It's the largest tropical aquarium in the western hemisphere, and features an enormous Open Ocean tank. There's an acrylic tunnel through the tank, giving visitors the feeling of truly being underwater. Among the diverse array of sea life in the 60 exhibits at the aquarium, you'll see octopuses, stingrays, turtles, sea horses, moray eels, jellies, and sharks, and you'll learn about dolphins, whales, and monk seals – not to mention thousands of fish. Maui Ocean Center also has the largest collection of live corals in the country.

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Kahului
1 Tour and Activity

The town of Kahului on Maui is often just the starting point for vacations on the island, but if you've got a bit of spare time there are some good reasons to explore Kahului before moving on.

Kahului is one of the main shopping destinations for Maui residents, and it's home to one of Hawaii's largest airports. Besides shopping, however, you can also check out the Kanaha Beach Park and Kanaha Pond State Wildlife Sanctuary. The former is a relatively hidden beach (behind the airport), and the latter is a bird sanctuary with some endangered Hawaiian bird species. There's also a botanical gardens featuring solely native Hawaiian flora. The town's history is closely tied to the sugar industry, which you can trace at Kahului's Alexander & Baldwin Sugar Museum. Many visitors to Kahului know it as the starting point for the scenic Hana Highway (also known as the Road to Hana), which winds more than 50 miles along the northern shore of the island from Kahului to Hana.

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Maui Tropical Plantation
8 Tours and Activities

For a look at what Maui's agricultural life once looked like, visit Maui Tropical Plantation – a sort of plantation theme park that's also still a working plantation.

Maui Tropical Plantation covers about 60 acres, and was originally designed to turn the island's rich agricultural history into a tourist attraction. There is a tram ride you can take, which includes a narrated tour of the plantation and historic information. You'll learn about crops for which Maui is famous – sugar cane, pineapple, coffee, bananas, and macadamia nuts, among other things. You can even try your hand at husking a coconut.

In addition to the crops themselves, the plantation also features the Maui Country Store, which is full of products made on the island of Maui. There's an on-site restaurant, too, where you can sample some of the fresh fruits you see growing in the fields all around you.

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Ulupalakua Ranch
13 Tours and Activities

In the southern region of Maui near Haleakala lies Ulupalakua Ranch, the second largest cattle ranch on the Hawaiian island of Maui. Ulupalakua Ranch covers 18,000 acres stretching from the ocean up the sloping side of Haleakala Volcano. The ranch reaches an elevation of 6,000 feet at its highest point. Visitors to the ranch will mostly hang out at 2,000 feet, which still boasts incredible views of Maui and the nearby islands of Lanai and Molokai. The views are a big draw of Ulupalakua Ranch, but they aren't the only reason people like to visit it while traveling in Maui.

Ulupalakua Ranch also has many activities visitors can partake in. Horseback riding is available through Makena Stables. Wine enthusiasts will enjoy visiting as Ulupalakua Ranch is home to the only winery on the island. Sporting clay shooting is also available, which lets you shoot at a variety of stands, some with moving parts.

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Ali'i Kula Lavender Farm
10 Tours and Activities

When most people think of lavender farms, they don’t think of Hawaii. But this farm’s fragrant seaside breezes and sweeping ocean vistas might make you forget all about France and merge the colorful purple blooms forever in your mind with memories of Maui. The (relatively) tiny Ali’i Kula Lavender Farm welcomes visitors for daily tours of its 13.5-acre cliff-side plot sporting 45 different varieties of the calming herb. It’s location in Kula, 4,000 feet above sea level in the Island’s elevated central region, enjoys a Mediterranean climate and also grows olive trees, hydrangea, South African protea and succulents. Explore the farm on your own via their lavender treasure hunt or take a guided walking or golf-cart property tour departing several times each day (additional costs apply). In case you needed another way to relax on Maui, the farm house’s large lanai (porch) overlooking its gardens, white gazebo and the sea provides the perfect spot to indulge in lavender tea.

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ʻIao Valley State Monument
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11 Tours and Activities

The iconic rock pinnacle known as the Iao Needle is the focus of Maui’s Iao Valley State Park. Rising 2,250 feet (675 meters) into the air, the unusual plant-covered peak rises from the Iao Valley floor, surrounded by rainforest-covered volcanic craters, pools and streams.

The pinnacle was used as an altar, and the evocative location was the site of a famous battle between Kamehameha and the warriors of Maui. Come to the Iao Valley State Park to follow easy hiking trails along tumbling streams. Views take in the Iao Needle, all the way across the rainforest to the coast at Kahului.

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Ocean Vodka Organic Farm and Distillery
9 Tours and Activities

There’s something special about where Ocean organic vodka is made — perhaps it’s the fact that it’s created on a Maui farm or that it’s the only spirit made with organic cane sugar and deep ocean mineral water. Situated on 22,000 square feet of grass near the base of Mount Haleakala, the farm and distillery have scenic views of their sugar cane plants and the surrounding coastline.

Tours of the distilling process and farm take place daily, emphasizing the importance of organic farming and sustainability. With an emphasis on environmentally and socially conscious practices, the tour gives a behind-the-scenes glimpse into production from start to finish. There is even a small herb garden on volcanic soil that produces the flavors for the cocktails they serve. Visitors can sample both the sugar cane juice or mineral water and the finished product.

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Molokai Island
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4 Tours and Activities

The island of Molokai may not be as popular with tourists as other Hawaiian islands, but it offers stunning scenery and plenty of opportunities to relax. Molokai's landscape includes two volcanoes, a large white sand beach, and a sacred valley – all in an island that's only 38 miles long and ten miles across. You can ride a mule through Kalaupapa National Historical Park (the only way to access the park), go camping at Papohaku Beach, and explore the Halawa Valley – where Polynesians are believed to have settled in the 7th century. Molokai is also said to be the place where hula comes from, where the goddess Laka first danced the hula. Today, there is an annual hula festival on Molokai each May.

During the mid-19th century, Molokai was the setting for a leper colony. The site of the settlement in Kalaupapa is still occupied by some of its former patients, so access is by invitation or organized tour only.

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Wailea
2 Tours and Activities

The town of Wailea is located on Maui's southwestern coast, known as a beach resort with spectacular beaches and luxury resort hotels. Wailea itself is relatively small, with a population under 6,000, but it's home to no less than five resort hotels – including two huge luxury properties. There are a number of really excellent beaches, such as Ulua Beach, Polo Beach and Wailea Beach, and there are three golf courses that make Wailea a popular draw for golfing vacations, too.

Even if you're not staying in one of the fancy beachfront hotels, you can still enjoy Wailea's gorgeous scenery. Put on your walking shoes and head for the coastal nature trail that winds along the water. It's paved, so it's easy going, and it'll give you an up-close look at an abundance of unique Hawaiian plants. In the morning, the trail is full of joggers, and in the evening, it's an ideal spot to watch the sunset.

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More Things to Do in Maui

Wailea Beach

Wailea Beach

5 Tours and Activities

Although the Wailea resort complex is graced with numerous beaches, the epicenter of the beach scene will forever be Wailea Beach. Voted as the #1 beach in America in 1999, this stretch of golden sand which fronts the Grand Wailea and Four Seasons resorts offers everything from snorkeling and standup paddling to outrigger canoe paddling and playful bodyboarding. Fun-loving yet undeniably luxurious, Wailea Beach is the postcard of luxury you would expect from a Maui resort complex.

Even though private cabanas line the shoreline (and there is a great chance of spotting a celebrity), Wailea Beach is a public beach and is open to anyone in the community. Public parking lots are found at neighboring Ulua Beach as well as next to the Four Seasons, and a two-mile coastal path connects Wailea Beach with Polo beaches, which is a similar island favorite.

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Bailey House Museum

Bailey House Museum

The Bailey House is a historical house and museum operated by the Maui Historical Society. It houses the largest collection of Hawaiian artifacts on Maui, many dating back to the 19th century when the house was built. The home was constructed as a mission in 1833 on what was then the royal compound of Kahekili, the last ruling chief of Maui, and the second story contains many of the koa wood furniture that belonged to the missionary Edward Bailey, who lived in the house. The first floor contains remnants of native Hawaiian life, from wooden bowls and utensils to spears and shark teeth used in battle. The museum also houses a private collection of Edward Bailey’s paintings of Maui along with the oldest surviving photographs of the island.

Outside you can view dozens of native Hawaiian plants in the house gardens. There is a 100-year-old outrigger canoe and a historic surfboard that belonged to Duke Kahanamoku in an outdoor gallery beside the entrance to the house.

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Kahului Harbor

Kahului Harbor

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4 Tours and Activities

The second largest of the islands, Maui is known for its legendary Road to Hana (aka the Hana Highway). This scenic route past waterfalls and beaches is one of the most popular attractions on the island and makes a great shore excursion. Other shore excursions include snorkeling and trips to the Haleakala Crater, a well-known sunset spot.

Maui has great beaches, including white-sand Kaanapali Beach near Lahaina, so don’t be afraid to spend your whole day in port on the sand.

Ships dock in Kahului Harbor on the north coast or anchor off Lahaina on the west coast. If you’re not taking an organized tour, you’ll want a rental car to get around the island. Most of the rental companies have shuttles from each port to take you to one of the airports to pick up your car.

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Wailuku

Wailuku

1 Tour and Activity

The city of Wailuku sits on the northern coast of Maui, once a major tourist destination on the island and now a commercial and governmental center. As the Maui County seat, Wailuku is home to the county government and was historically home to some of the Kingdom of Hawaii's most esteemed leaders. It was also a major center of the sugar cane industry in Hawaii in the 19th century.

The town is situated on the coast, but at its back is the mouth of the Iao Valley, a gorgeous and lush state park that was sacred to the old Hawaiian gods and a burial ground for Hawaiian royalty. The valley was also the setting for a legendary 18th century battle in the fight to unify the islands as one kingdom. Visitors to Wailuku today can explore the city's historic monuments, browse its unique local shops and restaurants, and use it as a base for visiting the Iao Valley.

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Little Beach

Little Beach

1 Tour and Activity

Little Beach is smaller and more sheltered than many of the beaches on Maui. It is accessed by walking from the neighboring Big Beach, though the two are separated by a large lava rock wall and a five-minute hike. Its fine, white stretch of sand is only slightly more difficult to access than the average beach, but crowds are reduced here. Conditions are often good for both surfing and boogie boarding, and lava rock trails around the beach area lead to some smaller coves and viewpoints of the beaches of Makena State Park.

Also known as "Puʻu Olai,” the beach attracts a free-spirited crowd, with drum circles and fire dancing every Sunday evening. Aside from the blue waters and fine sands, it is a great spot to do some snorkeling (pending current conditions) and watch a famous Hawaiian sunset away from the crowds.

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Surfing Goat Dairy

Surfing Goat Dairy

1 Tour and Activity
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Makawao

Makawao

Makawao is a town in Paniolo (Hawaiian cowboy) country beside the slopes of Maui’s Haleakala volcano. The Paniolo culture of horseback riding and cattle wrangling has been present here since the 19th century, with green hillside pastures and ranches throughout the area. The Paniolo influence can still be felt — with horse-hitching posts in the streets and with the unique architectural style of the downtown buildings. Rodeos take place some weekends here, the largest of which is held annually during Fourth of July.

In the past, plantations covered this densely forested area. The name ‘Makawao’ means “eye of the forest.” The higher elevation in this area makes it especially conducive to agriculture, including pineapples and the Maui onion. Today, the town of Makawao is known for its thriving art scene. As such, there are dozens of art galleries, shops, small restaurants and boutiques to explore along the town’s main street.

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Kalaupapa National Historical Park

Kalaupapa National Historical Park

5 Tours and Activities

Just off Maui’s shore on the island of Molokai, Kalaupapa National Historic Park is the former site of two leper colonies. People living with Hansen’s disease (leprosy) have been quarantined here since the days of King Kamehameha, and a community of cured patients still inhabits the Kalaupapa Settlement, scenically surrounded by steep Pali cliffs. The park is dedicated to preserving the experiences of the past so that they might be learned from in the present and future.

Father Damien, a Belgian missionary, first came to Molokai in the 19th century and cared for the afflicted until his death. In doing so, he brought awareness of the disease to the rest of the world. Once completely isolated, the peaceful area is now a center for education and reflection. Historic churches, homes, and cemeteries can still be seen. Out of respect for the residents, the number of visitors is limited to 100 per day.

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