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Things to Do in Milan

Known as the world’s capital of fashion, the northern Italian city of Milan dazzles with glamour, architecture, and history. The fast-paced Italian banking and business center is also renowned for its artistic masterpieces. Private and small-group tours offer skip-the-line access to notable sights along with in-the-know commentary from an expert guide. Tour options include traveling by foot, bike, historic tram, or even a classic Italian sports car. Take a walking tour to explore Milan’s iconic, many-spired Gothic Duomo, which sits at the center of the city overlooking a bustling piazza. Continue on to discover the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II shopping center and the world-famous La Scala opera house. Use your tour’s special access to skip the lines to admire Leonardo da Vinci’s intricate fresco “The Last Supper,” which adorns one wall of the UNESCO-listed Church of Santa Maria delle Grazie's rectory. Take a cultural art tour to find additional Leonardos around town, including the canals in the Navigli and an enormous horse statue near the stadium that was commissioned in 1482. Find the tour that’s right for you, whether you’d like to focus on shopping, hip Milanese cuisine, or wine or beer tasting. Milan also makes a good base for further exploring the region, with options like taking a day trip tour of Lake Como, roaring on a scenic rail trip into the Swiss Alps, or escaping to romantic Verona.
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Milan Duomo
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Milan’s Cathedral, or Duomo, is a much-loved symbol of the city. The most exuberant example of Northern Gothic in Italy, its spiky spires and towers dominate Piazza del Duomo, Milan’s beating heart.

The Duomo’s exterior is an upwardly thrusting collection of pinnacles, elongated statues and buttresses. The central spire is topped by a gilt statue of the Madonna, called the Madonnina.

Inside one of the world’s largest churches, it takes a few moments for your eyes to adjust to the candle-lit ambiance as you take in the cathedral’s nave, altars, aisles and stained-glass windows.

One of the highlights of a visit to the cathedral is the view from the roof – on a clear day you can see the Italian Alps. Take the steps if you’re fit (or the lift if you’re not) to peer over the city of Milan, surrounded by statues and spiky towers.

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Da Vinci's Last Supper (Il Cenacolo)
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Whether you visit Milan due to your love of art or as a reader of Dan Brown Da Vinci Code, you’ll be sure to head to Il Cenacolo Vinciano to see Leonardo da Vinci’s mural The Last Supper, or Cenacolo. The famous wall painting covers the wall of the refectory next to the Church of Santa Maria delle Grazie, on the western outskirts of central Milan. The painting represents the moment when Jesus predicts that one of his Apostles will betray him. The wall painting has suffered dreadfully over the centuries from the depredations of damp, war and poor restorations. A recent restoration program was completed in 1999, toning down the gaudy colors of previous restorations to more subdued pastels.
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Sforza Castle (Castello Sforzesco)
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The Castello Sforzesco (or Sforza Castle) is a huge, classically crenellated pile of red-brick masonry on the western edge of central Milan. The castle was built by the earlier Visconti dynasty, but became home to the ruling Sforza family in 1450. Stark and domineering, the castle is propped up with massive round battlements, and a stepped tower overlooks the central courtyard and gardens. Leonardo da Vinci helped design the defensive walls. Today the castle houses a handful of excellent museums and galleries. See sculptures by Michelangelo in the Museum of Ancient Art off the courtyard, and a rich collection of paintings by the likes of Titian and Bellini in the Pinacoteca ("art gallery") on the 1st floor. Wooden sculptures and furnishings fill the Museum of Applied Arts, again on the 1st floor, next door to the Museum of Musical Instruments. You’ll also find Egyptian and prehistoric collections in this huge castle complex.
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Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II
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Grab your shopping bag to go browsing in the world’s most elegant covered arcade, the glass-domed Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II. Many shopping arcades have tried to copy the Galleria’s scale, grandeur and glorious decor, but few have matched it. Completed in 1877, the cross-shaped shopping mall is bright and airy, thanks to its iron and glass curved roof, and the floor is patterned in marble mosaic tiles. Shops with awnings and large plate-glass windows line the ground floor, including luxury Prada, Gucci and Louis Vuitton boutiques. You’ll also find some of Milan’s most lauded and historic cafes, including Biffi and Zucca’s Bar.
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La Scala Opera House (Teatro alla Scala)
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La Scala is one of the world’s great opera houses. Built in Milan a stone’s throw from the Duomo in the late 1770s, the theater has seen premiers of some extraordinarily well-loved operas, including works by Rossini, Puccini and many by Italy’s beloved Verdi. The word “scala” means “staircase” in Italian, but the theater gets its name because it was built on the site where the church of Santa Maria alla Scala once stood.

The theater at La Scala holds more than 3,000 spectators, and the walls are adorned with gold and the boxes are lined with red velvet.

Although La Scala’s opera season isn’t year-round you can still get a peek inside. Plan to visit La Scala’s museum, which is inside the opera house. If your museum visit doesn’t coincide with a rehearsal on the main stage then you get to walk into one of the theater’s red velvet boxes for a few minutes.

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QC Termemilano
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The QC Terme company (founded by the Quadrio Curzio brothers) operates a chain of wellness spas in Italy, including QC Termemilano. Milan isn't known as a relaxing place, but right in the heart of the city QC Termemilano offers a place to escape the city. The day spa occupies a 19th-century former tram station, when the trams were led by horses. The QC Terme chain continues the belief that thermal baths offer unique therapy for ailments, and they are also a place for community to gather.

The facilities at QC Termemilano include saunas, whirlpools, steam baths, water massages, mud baths, and more. The healthy atmosphere extends to the buffet, which features fresh fruit, yogurt, and pastries. There's also an aperitivo buffet every day at 5:30pm.

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Via della Spiga
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Milan's fashion sense is world famous, and one of the streets to visit to see where the locals buy their designer brands is Via della Spiga. Along with other nearby streets such as Via Monte Napoleone, Via della Spiga is considered to be part of the Quadrilatero della Moda, or “fashion quarter.” Via della Spiga forms the northeastern border of the quarter.

Some of the designer names you'll see along Via della Spiga are Prada, Bulgari, Tod's, Armani, Hermes, Tiffany, Dolce & Gabbana, Roberto Cavalli, and Moschino. It's a pedestrianized street, making it a pleasure to wander – even if you're not planning to buy.

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Bagatti Valsecchi Museum (Museo Bagatti Valsecchi)
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A visit to the historic Bagatti Valsecchi house museum in Milan is a step back in time to when every Italian palazzo was a private home. As a bonus, it also houses a nice art collection.

The Bagatti Valsecchi Museum is in the Montenapoleone area of central Milan, and was once the home of the Bagatti Valsecchi brothers – Fausto and Giuseppe. They died in the early 1900s, and the palazzo stayed in the family until 1974, when one of Giuseppe's sons sold the palazzo to the region of Lombardy for use as a museum to house the brothers' impressive collection of decorative arts and paintings. Among the items in the collection are furniture, tapestries, glassware, ivory, and ceramics. The paintings include works by Donatello and Bellini. The intention of the Bagatti Valsecchi Foundation was to create a reproduction of a 16th-century Italian nobleman's home, including period furnishings and décor.

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Quadrilatero d'Oro
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Milan is a famous city of fashion, so it's no surprise that there is a neighborhood known as the fashion district, or the Quadrilatero della Moda.

As in other fashion districts the world over, Milan's Quadrilatero della Moda is home not only to high-end boutiques and designer flagship stores, but also the headquarters of some of Italy's top design houses. Shops you can visit in this area include Versace, Armani, Gucci, Missoni, Dolce & Gabbana, Zegna, Diesel, Prada and Sisley, among many others (including plenty of international fashion brands).

In addition to the ample shopping opportunities, you'll also find many restaurants, chic cafes and luxury hotels in the fashion district. Some of the designers have their own restaurants and hotels in their shopping centers. Several of the streets are pedestrian-only, to make window shopping even easier.

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Leonardo3 Museum
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The Leonardo3 Museum is an interactive exhibit representing the multi-disciplinary skills of one of Italy's greatest sons – Leonardo da Vinci. The temporary Leonardo3 exhibit consists of more than 200 interactive machines and models based on Leonardo's designs. A highlight of the exhibit is a digitized version of the entire Codex Atlanticus, more than 1,100 sheets of Leonardo's designs, writing, and drawings.

Among the models on display in the exhibit – some of which have never been built before – is The Flying Machine of Milan, including Leonardo's illuminated drawings for it. Also on display are his original designs for the huge bronze horse that stands in San Siro – it wasn't completed during Leonardo's lifetime.

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More Things to Do in Milan

Brera

Brera

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In a city of many trendy neighborhoods, the Brera district in Milan is one of the most charming. Located very close to the Duomo in the historic center, this is the part of Milan that might make you forget about the city’s hustle-bustle reputation.

The Brera neighborhood is a maze of narrow, cobblestoned streets lined with boutiques and cafes - during nice weather, cafe life spills onto the sidewalks and makes for an excellent place to do some serious people-watching. The designer shopping district called the Quadrilatero d’Oro is nearby, so you can get a peek at some of Milan’s shopping class making their rounds, too.

Aside from just wandering through the Brera and enjoying the scene, the main attraction in the neighborhood is the Pinacoteca di Brera, a fantastic art museum with works by Botticelli, Raphael, Hayez, Titian, Caravaggio, Tintoretto, Mantegna, Piero della Francesca, Rembrandt, and Rubens.

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Sempione Park (Parco Sempione)

Sempione Park (Parco Sempione)

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Milan is a busy, modern city that - when you’re really yearning for Italian medieval hilltop towns - can feel a little hard to love. At those times, it’s important to do as the Milanese do and escape the city (even for just a little while) in one of the big green spaces. One of the most popular is Parco Sempione in central Milan.

Parco Sempione covers 116 acres in the city center, just behind the Castello Sforzesco. It was laid out in the late 1800s, and received a major facelift in 1996. The grounds include gravel paths for walking or jogging, a triumphal arch at the far end of the park, a lake, and even a small arena used for concerts and some sporting events. There’s also a tower in the park - the Torre Branca - built in 1933 and offering views over the entire city.
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La Triennale Museum (La Triennale di Milano)

La Triennale Museum (La Triennale di Milano)

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Milan is home to some notable collections of historic art, but don't miss the fantastic contemporary design and art at La Triennale Museum in Parco Sempione. La Triennale Museum is inside the Palazzo dell'Arte, which was built in 1933 for the Triennale decorative arts show. The event happens every three years (hence the name “Triennale”), but the Palazzo dell'Arte now houses permanent collections you can visit year-round.

Perhaps the best known is the Triennale Design Museum, opened in 2007 to showcase the history of Italian design. It's a fascinating collection of everyday objects made to resemble art, and vice versa. Also in the same building is the Design Library (with thousands of books, magazines, and photographs available for reference) and the Teatro dell'Arte (a performance space for music, theater, and dance). There's also a nice cafe at the back overlooking Parco Sempione.

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Leonardo’s Vineyard (Vigna di Leonardo)

Leonardo’s Vineyard (Vigna di Leonardo)

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Across the street from Leonardo da Vinci’s famous fresco of “The Last Supper” is the vineyard he was given by Milanese ruler, Ludovico Sforza, in 1495. The type of vines was identified during excavations in 2015, and the vineyard has been replanted with the same varietal Leonardo grew. The plot has been designed as it was in Leonardo’s time. The house behind which the vineyard sits was not Leonardo’s, but he tended the vineyard himself. Visitors to the vineyard first get to see the beautifully-renovated Renaissance villa, Casa degli Atellani, and then a walk through the picturesque gardens and vineyard. Tours of the house and vineyard are guided by a member of the staff, and every visitor receives an audio guide to help navigate through and learn about the seven distinct areas on the tour. For a special visit to this unique attraction, visitors can enjoy an evening tour with aperitivo in the vineyard or a combination ticket that includes “The Last Supper” fresco.

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Arch of Peace (Arco della Pace)

Arch of Peace (Arco della Pace)

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The Arch of Peace is an arch of celebration in Milan, Italy. Originally called the Arch of Triumph, it was built in the early 19th century to honor Napoleon's victories, although it was not completed. Several years later, under Austrian rule, construction resumed in a few different phases and was finally completed as the Arch of Peace in 1838. The arch marks the place where the Strada del Sempione enters Milan. This road, which is still in use today, connects Milan with Paris. It was built using marble from the Swiss Alps, and at the top visitors can see a bronze chariot with six horses known as the Victories on Horseback. The arch was designed with a large central passageway and two smaller ones based on the Arch of Septimius Severus in the Roman Forum. It's decorated with Corinthian columns and various sculptures, including reliefs that depict events in Italian history from the time after Napoleon's rule.

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Piazza Fontana

Piazza Fontana

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Just a short walk from the landmark Duomo Cathedral, Piazza Fontana is one of central Milan’s prettiest piazzas, and a tranquil alternative to the bustling squares of nearby Piazza della Scala and Piazza del Duomo. Tree-lined gardens and shaded benches line the plaza, but the dramatic centerpiece is its namesake fountain - a Neoclassical design by Giuseppe Piermarini, sculpted out of pink granite and inaugurated in 1782.

Despite its peaceful surroundings, the piazza hit the headlines for all the wrong reasons back in 1969, as the location for the notorious bombing of the National Agrarian Bank, a terrorist attack that saw 17 people killed, and a plaque has been erected in their honor.

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Basilica of Sant'Ambrogio (Basilica di Sant'Ambrogio)

Basilica of Sant'Ambrogio (Basilica di Sant'Ambrogio)

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The Romanesque Basilica of Sant'Ambrogio is dedicated to Milan's patron saint, Ambrose, Bishop of Milan, who founded the church in the 4th century. Dressed in his bishop's finery, the saint's skeleton is displayed in the basilica's crypt.

The church embraces a mix of styles, having been rebuilt in the 11th century and much restored since then. The building has a squat, medieval Lombard facade thanks to its elongated atrium dating back to the year 1098.

Byzantine reliefs crown the 6th century capitals, and a graceful loggia lined with arches leads to the basilica's entrance. Two towers of different heights flank the atrium.

The highlight of the restrained interior in white and terracotta is the apse mosaic of Christ. You’ll also see carved pulpits and tombs, including the final resting place of Emperor Louis II.

The Basilica of Sant’Ambrogio was heavily bombed during the Second World War and has been extensively restored.

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10 Corso Como

10 Corso Como

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If 10 Corso Como sounds like an address, it is. It also happens to be one of Milan's most fasionable addresses, home to a number of attractions and shops.

10 Corso Como (it's Dieci Corso Como in Italian, as "dieci" is the word for 10) was originally an art gallery and bookstore, opened in a traditional Milanese building 1990 by Carla Sozzani. The complex grew over the years to include a cafe, a fashion boutique, a roof garden, and even a tiny hotel (with only three rooms) - all at the same address. The courtyard cafe at 10 Corso Como is particularly popular for aperitivo, and getting a table can be incredibly difficult. You can enjoy the "see and be seen" atmosphere simply by browsing the shops, however.

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San Siro Stadium (Stadio San Siro)

San Siro Stadium (Stadio San Siro)

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Milan is home to two major soccer teams and Italy's largest stadium – San Siro Stadium – where both of them play their home games. San Siro was built in 1925, originally home to just the AC Milan team. In 1947, AC Milan's rivals, FC Internazionale, also moved in. In addition to these top-tier teams, the Italian national team also plays games at San Siro, and it's frequently used as a concert venue for big touring bands. As a football stadium, the capacity of San Siro is now just over 80,000, Italy's largest stadium.

There is a museum at the stadium dedicated to both AC Milan and FC Internazaionale, and when you take a guided tour of San Siro you get to visit each team's locker room.

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Milan Monumental Cemetery (Cimitero Monumentale di Milano)

Milan Monumental Cemetery (Cimitero Monumentale di Milano)

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Some cemeteries are like small cities, such as the Monumental Cemetery in Milan. It's the second-largest cemetery in Milan, and its paths are adorned with a fantastic array of sculptural tombs. Milan's Monumental Cemetery (Cimitero Monumentale in Italian) was opened in 1866, originally built to consolidate the large number of smaller cemeteries around the city. Two new and very large cemeteries were created: one for the wealthy (Cimitero Monumentale) and one for everyone else (Cimitero Maggiore). Because it has been the final resting place for so many wealthy and famous people over the years, the tombs and mausoleums are often works of art.

Argentina's Eva Peron was secretly buried in this Milan cemetery until 1971 because of anti-Peron sentiments in her home country, and Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi was buried here for about a month before his body was moved. Today, the main draw for non-Italian visitors is the way the cemetery resembles an outdoor sculpture garden.

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Ticinese

Ticinese

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Milan's Ticinese district is in the southern part of the historic center, known for its shops and restaurants. It houses one of Milan's old city gates, originally built in the 16th century, while today's gate dates from the 19th century and marks the southern end of the Corso di PortaTicinese. This street is lined with shops, and – along with nearby Via Torino – is known particularly for its shoe shops.

The Ticinese area is historically working class, as is the nearby Navigli district, but both are becoming more upscale as hip cafes and restaurants move in. There are historic attractions here, including Milan's best-preserved Roman ruins, as well as a weekly antiques market.

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Corso Buenos Aires

Corso Buenos Aires

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Church of Santa Maria delle Grazie (Chiesa di Santa Maria delle Grazie)

Church of Santa Maria delle Grazie (Chiesa di Santa Maria delle Grazie)

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Most visitors seek out the church of Santa Maria delle Grazie to pay their respects to Leonardo da Vinci’s Last Supper. The famous mural is housed in the refectory of the adjoining Dominican convent.

Visitors who take the time to explore the convent’s church, however, will be rewarded with a stroll through an impressive Renaissance building.

The church was built in Gothic and Romanesque styles by Sforza duke in 1490, and is believed to have been partially designed by Bramante.

The exterior is decorated in a restrained pattern of pilasters and circles, and the design features a lovely, tranquil cloister. Inside, the Gothic nave is decorated with beautifully restrained patterned details.

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Piazza Mercanti

Piazza Mercanti

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While the Piazza del Duomo is the most important square in central Milan today, that title went to the Piazza Mercanti in the Middle Ages. The Piazza Mercanti, or Merchants Square, is in Milan's historic center, a short walk to the northwest of the Duomo. The square originally was much larger than it is today, once occupying part of present-day Via Mercanti. Some of the buildings on the square date from its heyday, including the 13th century Palazzo della Ragione (essentially Milan's city hall at the time) and the 14th century Loggia degli Osii (another administrative building).

In the center of the piazza is a 16th century well that was later fitted with two columns in the 18th century. It's covered and unused today There was a stone found nearby upon which merchants found guilty of cheating – or bankruptcy, depending on the story you read – were punished by public shaming, forced to stand on the stone with their pants down, before being sent to jail.

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