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Gurudwara Sis Ganj Sahib
Gurudwara Sis Ganj Sahib

Gurudwara Sis Ganj Sahib

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Free admission
Chandni Chowk, New Delhi, India

The Basics

Dating back to 1930 (in its current incarnation), this gurdwara is one of nine historic Sikh temples across the capital city. It attracts pilgrims, tourists, and members of the local Sikh community for its spiritual and historical significance. This sight is a popular stop on Old Delhi tours, especially walking and bicycle-rickshaw tours, as well as tours and excursions that focus on the spiritual side of Delhi.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • The gurudwara is a must-visit for history lovers and those with an interest in spirituality.

  • Men and women should cover their heads and remove their shoes before entering the gurudwara.

  • Most people sit on the floor, but chairs are available for those who cannot do so.

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How to Get There

The temple is located in the Chandni Chowk neighborhood of Old Delhi, a seven-minute walk from the Chandni Chowk metro station on the Yellow Line and the Lal Qila metro station on the Violet Line. The area is crowded and best navigated on foot, but those who have a hard time walking can ride a bicycle-rickshaw from either metro station.

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Trip ideas

Don’t-Miss Dishes in New Delhi

Don’t-Miss Dishes in New Delhi


When to Get There

The gurudwara is open to the public daily from about 5am until 10pm. It's quiet first thing in the morning, but if you wish to partake in a communal meal at the gurudwara's community kitchen, you'll want to come after 11, when the food is ready; meal service continues throughout the day, depending on demand.

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Tegh Bahadur

Tegh Bahadur was the ninth of 10 Sikh gurus who, over a few centuries, collectively laid the foundation of the Sikh faith. He lived during a time when non-Muslims faced great persecution across what is now North India, and he was active in defending people of all faiths to worship as they wished. This didn't please the ruling Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb, who jailed the guru and subsequently beheaded him.

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