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Things to Do in New South Wales

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Sydney Harbour Bridge
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Few sights are as instantly recognizable as the Sydney Harbour Bridge, the grand centerpiece of Sydney Harbour and one of Australia's most photographed landmarks. The historic structure dates to 1932 and is the world's largest steel arch bridge. It's also an important transport hub, linking downtown Sydney with the north shore, Manly, and the area's northern beaches.

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Three Sisters
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The Three Sisters is an ancient rock formation located in the Blue Mountains National Park in the town of Katoomba. The towering trio of stone has a mythical dimension in the Aboriginal Dreamtime legend about three sisters who lived in the Jamison Valley and fell in love with three brothers from a rival tribe whom they were forbidden to marry.

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Sydney Harbour
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With the iconic silhouette of Sydney Opera House and the dramatic arch of Sydney Harbour Bridge etched against a backdrop of glittering ocean and soaring skyscrapers, Sydney Harbour is Australia’s quintessential postcard image. The harbor, the natural heart of Sydney, features more than 150 miles (240 kilometers) lined with golden beaches, lush gardens, and vibrant neighborhoods.

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Sydney Opera House
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A world-class performing arts venue and iconic Australian landmark, the Sydney Opera House—with its distinctive Jorn Utzon design—defines the Sydney Harbour district. Distinguished by soaring halls with a white ceramic–tiled exterior shaped to evoke the sails of a yacht, this UNESCO World Heritage Site is a must-see Sydney attraction and popular stop on most city tours.

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Cape Byron Lighthouse
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As Australia's easternmost and strongest lighthouse, Cape Byron Light is a main attraction for both the historical aspect of the building itself as well as the spectacular views it provides from the edge of Cape Byron. Opened for operation in 1901, the lighthouse provides Byron Bay visitors with a glimpse into the marine industry from years past when lighthouses had to be manned by live-in keepers so passing ships remained safe along the coast. Still active today, Cape Byron Light changed to a fully automated system in 1989, making a live-in keeper obsolete.

The eastern coast of Australia sees humpback whale migrations each year, and the lighthouse platform acts as the perfect vantage point for its 500,000 annual visitors, as well as the Southern Cross University's Whale Research Centre, which is located on the premises.

The lighthouse itself stands 74 feet tall (22.5 meters); an internal spiral staircase reaches from the lobby to its viewing platform. Onsite still stands the original lighthouse keeper's residence next to the assistant keepers' duplex. The original, kerosene-based light source has been upgraded over the years with a switch to electric in 1956. This is also the time when the light became the most powerful in all of Australia's lighthouses with an intensity of 2,200,000 cd.

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Scenic World
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Situated at the heart of Australia’s Blue Mountains UNESCO World Heritage Site, Scenic World offers the rare chance to explore the mountains from all angles. Ride overhead in a cable car, hike along the valley floor, ride a train through mountain tunnels, and discover some of the most impressive scenery in Blue Mountains National Park.

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Main Beach
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With sun-blushed golden sands, surf-worthy waves, and a backdrop of forested hills; Main Beach is Byron Bay’s flagship beach. Stretching along the town’s seafront promenade, it’s a favorite among locals and draws sunseekers from all around the country to swim, surf, and scuba dive.

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Fighter World
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With everything from a classic F-111 to the first Australian-built Vampire F-30 fighter, Fighter World boasts an impressive collection of Australian fighter jets. The aviation museum, located on the Royal Australian Air Force Base in Williamtown, offers the chance to peek behind the scenes and climb into the cockpits.

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Bondi Beach
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As Australia’s most famous beach—and the star of its own reality TV show, “Bondi Rescue”—Bondi Beach delivers with its crescent of golden sand, crashing waves, and crowds of bronzed sunseekers. Just minutes from downtown Sydney, this is the spot to work on your tan, hit the waves, sip cocktails at a beachside bar, or hike along coastal cliffs.

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Echo Point Lookout
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Anyone who’s seen a picture of the Blue Mountains should recognize Echo Point. Famous for its view of the Three Sisters, this sweeping viewpoint on the outskirts of Katoomba defines the Blue Mountains’ beauty. From this cliff top ledge, the jagged escarpment vertically drops towards the distant valley floor—a void where clouds can linger in the treetops nearly a thousand feet below.

Take a deep breath and drink in the beauty of the Blue Mountains’ southern flank, and then consider walking the “Giant Stairway” that drops down into the valley. Over 800 stairs that are carved from the mountain descend 1,000 vertical feet, where numerous hiking trails weave their way along the forested valley floor. Climbing the walls of the “Ruined Castle” is a popular valley hike, and is a good way to escape the crowds that tend to gather at the viewpoint. Rather than hiking back up the stairs, take a ride on the “Scenic Railway” that leads back to the top of the cliff. At inclines of up to 60° it’s considered the world’s steepest railway, and drops passengers at Scenic World—a short walk from Echo Point Lookout.

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More Things to Do in New South Wales

Wentworth Falls

Wentworth Falls

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Wentworth Falls is a charming town located in the Blue Mountains Heritage Site about 60 miles (100 kilometers) west from Sydney. Known for its eponymous waterfalls, the town has a number of walking and hiking trails, picnic and BBQ areas, a well-preserved Aboriginal site, and a charming downtown with historic buildings and gourmet coffee shops.

Leura

Leura

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Leura, sometimes called the “Jewel in the Mountains Crown,” is a small Blue Mountains village located about 60 miles (100 kilometers) west of Sydney. Smaller than neighboring Katoomba, with a quaint, cherry tree lined town center called the Leura Mall, the village exudes mill-town charm. There are cafes, bakeries, antiques shops, and high-end boutiques, with brightly colored flowers decorating the streets.

Wategos Beach

Wategos Beach

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The sheltered, picturesque Wategos Beach is popular on Cape Byron for surfing and relaxing. Numerous picnic tables and electric barbecues allow visitors to enjoy the pristine surrounds over lunch. The nearby Cape Byron Walking Track passes behind the beach, calling for an afternoon stroll. Lifeguard patrols provide a safer beach environment during the busier summer months.

Little Wategos Beach offers a more secluded vibe given the fact it can only be reached by foot from the neighboring Wategos Beach. Little Wategos sits on the tip of Cape Byron, making it the easternmost beach on Australia's mainland. Although usually inviting, swimmers are encouraged to practice caution as strong currents can form even on mild days.

Besides swimming and surfing (longboarding does well here), the Wategos Beach area sees its fair share of fishing, particularly for flathead and whiting.

Stockton Beach Sand Dunes

Stockton Beach Sand Dunes

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Stockton Beach has sand like any other beach, but this New South Wales spot has dunes of sand that reach up to 90 feet high. Historically the beach has been the site of several shipwrecks; the wreckage of some continues to wash ashore. The most well known wreck was the Sygna, an enormous Norwegian freight ship that crashed during a storm in 1974. What remains of the ship can be seen from the beach and has become a local landmark.

Today the area is a popular camping, sand boarding and 4WD vehicle area due to its firm sands and massive sand dunes. Camel and horseback rides, quad biking, and surfing make the Stockton Bight sand dunes an adventure and activity hub. There is also fishing and scuba diving in the waters off the coast. Clear rock pools nearby are a fun way to see various marine wildlife as well. The coastal desert wilderness stretches nearly 20 meters.

Tropical Fruit World

Tropical Fruit World

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With 65 hectares (175 acres) of fruit orchards and plantations open to visitors, Tropical Fruit World is one of the Gold Coast’s most unique tourist attractions. The eco-friendly, family-run farm grows over 500 varieties of tropical fruits, and visitors can not only go behind-the-scenes to discover the workings of the farm, but sample a delicious array of exotic fruits.

There’s plenty to see and do at Tropical Fruit World - take a Plantation Safari by tractor train, enjoy a wildlife boat cruise, ride a miniature train and get close to kangaroos, emus and Clydesdale horses at the fauna park. Of course, the best part is tasting the exotic fruits, juices and ice creams, so head to the Plantation Café to try unique varieties like cheese fruit, chocolate pudding fruit, caramel fruit and champagne fruit. There’s also a recreational area, with mini golf and a children’s playground; a fruit market where seasonal fruits like dragonfruit, jackfruit and papaya are on sale; and a shop, where you can purchase souvenirs like avocado oil cosmetics or home-made fruit jams.

Seal Rocks

Seal Rocks

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Located in New South Wales, between Port Macquarie and Newcastle along Australia’s eastern coast, the village of Seal Rocks is renowned for its undeveloped beaches and prime surfing opportunities. Visitors also come to see the impressive Sugarloaf Point Lighthouse, which offers stunning views.

Australian Reptile Park

Australian Reptile Park

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The Australian Reptile Park is a hands-on zoo and educational center on the Central Coast of New South Wales. Visitors to the park have opportunities to walk alongside a giant Galapagos turtle, take pictures with a koala, feed kangaroos, see tarantulas and venomous snakes, and watch a crocodile named Elvis eat his lunch.

The Rocks

The Rocks

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Located in central Sydney, the historic precinct of the Rocks is the oldest area in the city and the site of the first European settlement. Full of history and character, today the Rocks is home to fashionable boutiques, artisan markets, historic pubs, trendy restaurants, and a thriving arts and culture scene.

Tamarama Beach

Tamarama Beach

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Bondi beach might be Sydney’s most headline-grabbing beach, but another local favorite is right nearby – Tamarama Beach. The small bay stretches just 80 meters along the coast and it’s an idyllic setting, with its golden sands framed by rugged sandstone headlands and lush parks.

Tamarama has long had a reputation as one of the city’s most exclusive beaches and its young, fashionable crowds has earned it the nickname ‘Glamarama’ among locals. The consistent surf and big breaks also make Tamarama a top choice for adventurous surfers, but with dangerous riptides at both sides of the bay, swimmers are advised not to venture outside of the marked safe zones.

Southern Highlands

Southern Highlands

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The Southern Highlands of New South Wales are a combination of natural sites, including mountains, caves, and waterfalls, and quaint villages filled with historic homes and heritage sites. Visitors to the area can picnic, hike, or bike through Morton National Park or enjoy a leisurely afternoon in the Corbett Gardens of Bowral. Alternatively, visit the many historic manors and mansions that dot the small towns like Berrima, Bundanoon, and Bungendore. Charming cafes and traditional pubs round out the experience.

The rolling green hills of the Southern Highlands are home to cooler temperatures, with ideal conditions for producing wine. A handful of excellent vineyards are open for tours and tastings. Whether you’re exploring the outdoors — the Fitzroy Falls, Illawarra Fly Tree Top Walk, Wombeyan Caves, to name a few — or soaking in the historic ambiance of small, old towns, the Southern Highlands provides a contrast to the bustle of urban life in Sydney.

Sydney Central Business District

Sydney Central Business District

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Nowhere in Sydney has a quicker pulse than the city's Central Business District (CBD), where travelers shopping on Pitt Street converge with the city's top business professionals, and financiers making deals in skyscrapers peer down at pedestrians below. Beginning at Circular Quay in the north, the Central Business District runs south for 2 miles (3.2 km) to the central rail line and extends east to west from the trees of Hyde Park to the ship masts of Darling Harbour.

While one of the best ways to experience the bustling district is simply by strolling on foot, travelers can also people-watch and explore the area on a hop-on, hop-off bus tour. More than just modern construction and skyscrapers, there are still a handful of historic pockets in the downtown area, including Macquarie Street, which features early 19th-century barracks, churches and state offices. For a classic Sydney CBD meander, begin at Hyde Park and take Macquarie Street up to the Sydney Opera House, or cruise the stalls of the Pitt Street pedestrian mall while en route to Circular Quay.

Mrs Macquarie's Chair

Mrs Macquarie's Chair

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This unique landmark—a massive rock fashioned into a cozy bench—was carved from sandstone in the early 1800s by Gov. Lachlan Macquarie for his wife Elizabeth. As the story goes, when the weather was warm and the sun high, Mrs Macquarie loved to relax at the point of this scenic peninsula and stare out over the ocean.

Today, travelers enjoy a leisurely walk to Mrs Macquarie’s Chair from the iconic Opera House or wander over to this historic attraction after a visit to the nearby Royal Botanic Garden. In a bustling city that’s alive with energy, the stone bench offers visitors a perfect place to unwind, relax and take in the some of the best views of Sydney Harbour.

Blue Mountains

Blue Mountains

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A UNESCO World Heritage Site covering an area of around 3,861 square miles (10,000 square kilometers), the Blue Mountains region is a popular day-trip destination from Sydney. Featuring tall forests, sandstone cliffs, dramatic canyons, and scenic lookouts and waterfalls, the area is a paradise for nature lovers and outdoor enthusiasts.

Cape Byron

Cape Byron

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Australia mainland's easternmost point of Cape Byron possesses a number of reasons to pay it a visit: the Cape Byron Light, the Cape Byron Marine Park, and the Cape Byron walking track. Set about 1.9 miles (3 km) northeast of the quaint Byron Bay, Cape Byron lies in the Cape Byron State Conservation Area.

A day trip from Byron Bay can be spent first at the Cape Byron Light – a lighthouse that was opened in 1901 and is still in use today. A climb to the top, through the internal spiral staircase, brings visitors to a glorious viewing platform looking out across the Pacific Ocean, which is a prime place to catch whales, sea turtles, dolphins and other passing wildlife.

Wildlife lovers will enjoy the many sheltered beaches and protected reefs that encompass the 54,000 acre Cape Byron Marine Park. Swimming, fishing (in some areas), kayaking and diving are all possible around Cape Byron, the latter of which is good for getting up close and personal with the likes of sea turtles, fish, rays and sharks. But getting in or on the water isn't always necessary; whale watching and dolphin spotting are popular from the shore.

Catch a bit of fresh air and exercise by hitting Cape Byron's 2.3 mile (3.7 km) walking track. This track takes walkers and cyclists to top attractions such as the Captain Cook Lookout, Palm Valley, Wategos Beach and the Cape Byron Lighthouse.