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Caveau de la Huchette
Caveau de la Huchette

Caveau de la Huchette

Open Sun-Wed 9.30pm-2.30am
5 Rue de la Huchette, Paris, France

The Basics

Enjoy a night at Le Caveau de la Huchette as part of a walking tour that covers the city’s storied Jazz Age and its current vibrant scene. Stop at legendary haunts in Les Halles, the Latin Quarter, and St-Germain-des-Prés such as Les Deux Magots, Café de Flore, Club St-Germain-des-Prés, La Chat Qui Pêche, and Le Duc des Lombards. Round out a perfect day with dinner and live jazz concert.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Le Caveau de la Huchette is an ideal spot to see great live jazz performances.
  • The crowd is typically a mix of locals and tourists.
  • Dress code is, at the minimum, smart casual. No shorts or sneakers in this house of jazz.
  • Entry is about US$15.xa0
  • In the basement, rolicking swing dancers take over the dance floor.
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How to Get There

Le Caveau de la Huchette is located on rue de la Huchette in Paris’s 5th arrondissement, also known as the Latin Quarter. Take Métro line 4 or RER B or C to Saint-Michel Notre-Dame, or line 10 to Cluny - La Sorbonne. The club is less than a block south of the Seine.

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When to Get There

Le Caveau de la Huchette is open nightly. Friday and Saturday nights the club stays open later, usually until 4am. Come during the week to beat the crowds, coming on weekends for maximum people-watching. Live performances typically begin at 9:30pm. Lovers of jazz might want to plan their trip around the excellent springtime jazz and blues festival, Banlieues Bleues.

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Wildcard

Le Caveau Torturous History What began as a medieval cellar became a meeting place of the Rosicrucians and the Templars in the 16th century, then a secret lodge with subterranean passages leading to Châtelet and Saint-Séverin in the 18th century. During the Revolution, the lower level was a torture and execution chamber, and a courtroom for trials, while upstairs people drank, sang, and argued about liberty; Robespierre and the like, among them. Original swords, muskets, and even a chastity belt of the epoch decorate the walls.

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