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Things to Do in Prague

Prague, the capital of the Czech Republic, is a Gothic fairy tale famed for exceptional beer, architectural beauty, and a thriving art scene. The Old Town (Stare Mesto) delights aimless wanderers with its medieval churches, hidden courtyards, and cobbled pedestrian streets, while a cruise on Vltava River is an ideal way to orientate yourself. Sightseeing tours, which reveal Charles Bridge, the Castle District (Hradcany), New Town (Nove Mesto), St. Vitus Cathedral, and Prague Astronomical Clock (Prague Orloj), make it easy to see why the entire city is a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site. Delve into Prague’s Jewish heritage during visits to the Jewish Museum and Terezin Concentration Camp; marvel at the Kutná Hora (Chapel of Bones) on a day trip to Sedlec Ossuary; or consume your fill of Czech food and beer on a brewery tour. Prague’s proximity to alluring European cities, including Germany, Poland, Austria, and Slovakia, make it an ideal jumping-off point for exploring more of the continent. If you’re using Prague as a base, day trips allow you to tick off Vienna and Dresden if you’re short on time, and excursions to UNESCO-listed Cesky Crumlov, the spa town of Karlovy Vary, and the Bohemian and Saxon Switzerland National Park expose farther-flung cultural and natural wonders in the Czech Republic.
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Prague Castle (Prazský Hrad)
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Sitting high on a hill overlooking the Charles Bridge and Vltava River, Prague Castle (Pražský Hrad) is a huge complex of museums, churches, palaces, and gardens dating from the ninth century. Nestled in the historic center of Prague—all of which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site—the largest castle complex in the world is an outstanding relic of Prague’s architectural history and a must for any visitor to the City of a Hundred Spires.

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Prague Old Town Square (Staromestské Námestí)
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Prague’s Old Town Square (Staroměstské náměstí) is the historic heart and navigational center of the city’s UNESCO-listed Old Town. A feast of architectural wonders, the medieval square is ringed with grandiose Romanesque, baroque, and Gothic style buildings, including some of Prague’s most photographed monuments.

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Charles Bridge (Karluv Most)
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Forming a grand walkway between Prague Old Town, and the Lesser Town and Castle District, the 15th-century Charles Bridge (Karluv Most) is one of the city’s most striking landmarks. The magnificent Gothic bridge features 16 stone arches, two watchtowers, and 30 blackened baroque statues depicting various saints.

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Wenceslas Square (Václavské Námesti)
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Wenceslas Square (Václavské Námesti), one of Prague’s largest public squares, is actually more of a boulevard. Wide and tree-lined with sidewalk cafes and stylish boutiques, it feels modern and cosmopolitan. The square is bursting with history—from its intricate art nouveau buildings to its poignant memorial to the victims of Soviet occupation.

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Strahov Monastery (Strahovský Kláster)
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Located close to Prague castle, Strahov Monastery (Strahovský Kláster) has been home to a community of monks since the 12th century. The monastery is one of the most important landmarks in the Czech Republic and is famous for its historic library, which contains countless volumes, including over 3,000 original manuscripts.

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St. Vitus Cathedral (Katedrála Sv. Vita)
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St. Vitus (or Katedrála svatého Víta) is the biggest and most important church in Prague, the pinnacle of the Castle complex, and one of the most knockout cathedrals in Europe. It's broodingly Gothic, with a forest of spires and a rose window to rival that of Notre Dame.

Enter by the Golden Portal to take a look at the stunningLast Judgement mosaic. Inside you'll find the final resting places of both Charles IV (who gave his name to Charles Bridge) and Saint Wenceslas. The chapel containing Wenceslas' remains is a stunner, encrusted with semi-precious stones.

The cathedral also contains the crown jewels of the Bohemian kings and an Art Nouveau window by Mucha. Climb the tower for a stunning view of the Castle District.

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Prague Astronomical Clock (Prague Orloj)
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One of Prague’s most popular tourist attractions, the Astronomical Clock (Prazský Orloj) was built in the 15th century and is a mechanical marvel. Found on the south side of Prague’s imposing town hall in Old Town Square (Staromestske namestí), visitors line up in their hundreds to see the display as the clock strikes the hour.

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Lesser Quarter (Mala Strana)
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Malá Strana is the area that meanders down from the Castle Hill to the Vltava River. A literal translation of its name would be 'Small Side' but its most often called the Lesser Side. Unfair? Well, while it might not have the grandeur of the Old Town across the river, many find it more charming.

Because the area was razed by fires in the 16th century, the architecture here is mainly baroque. Its finest site is the Wallenstein Palace with its fabulous walled garden full of fountains and statues. There's also the Church of Saint Nicholas and, high on Petřín Hill, a miniature replica of the Eiffel Tower.

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John Lennon Wall
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Starting life as a tribute to musical icon and peace activist John Lennon after his untimely death in 1980, Prague’s John Lennon Wall quickly became a symbol of peace and free speech for young Czechs angry and disillusioned with the country’s communist regime—much western pop music was banned under the regime, and some Czech musicians were even imprisoned for playing it.

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Rudolfinum
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The Rudolfinum is a prestigious music and art venue located on Jan Palach Square on the bank of the Vltava River in Prague. This impressive neo-Re­naissan­ce bu­il­ding was built between 1876 and 1884, opening in 1885 to serve as a multi-purpose cultural center combining concert halls and exhibition rooms.

Today, the Rudolfinum is home to the Ga­le­rie Ru­dol­fi­num and hosts a varied programme of classical music concerts and art exhibitions. It is the home venue of the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, which was founded in 1896. The Philharmonic Orchestra holds world-class classical performances throughout the year from the building’s largest hall, the Dvořák, which is one of the oldest concert halls in Europe and is noted for its exceptional acoustics.

As well as being able to buy tickets for various performances and exhibitions at the Rudolfinum, guided tours are available for those interested in the history and architecture of the building.

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More Things to Do in Prague

Hradcany (Castle Hill)

Hradcany (Castle Hill)

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Visible from all over town, hilltop Prague Castle (Pražský Hrad) is one of the city’s most memorable landmarks. The castle is just one part of Prague’s UNESCO World Heritage Site, Hradcany (Castle Hill), a vast complex of palaces, cathedrals, and royal buildings, including some of Prague’s finest works of architecture.

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Prague National Theatre (Národní Divadlo)

Prague National Theatre (Národní Divadlo)

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A major landmark along Prague’s Vltava river, the National Theatre (Národní Divadlo) is one of the city’s most culturally important landmarks, with a rich artistic tradition. Built in the late 19th century in neo-Renaissance style, it hosts a regular program of works of both classic and modern theater, ballet, and opera.

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Dancing House (Tancici Dum)

Dancing House (Tancici Dum)

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In a city known for its baroque, Gothic, and Art Nouveau architecture, Prague’s postmodern Dancing House (Tancící Dum) stands out for displaying none of these architectural styles. The curvaceous, concrete, metal, and glass building was designed by the architectural duo of Czech-Croatian Vlado Milunić and Canadian-American Frank Gehry (of Guggenheim Bilbao fame) and completed in 1996.

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Old New Synagogue (Staronová Synagoga)

Old New Synagogue (Staronová Synagoga)

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The Jewish ghetto in Prague grew up in Josefov around the Old New Synagogue (Staronová Synagoga), which was in use as early as 1270. It has the distinction of being oldest functioning synagogue in Europe – for over 700 years services were only halted during Nazi occupation between 1942–45 – and today it is once more the heart of Jewish worship in the city. A Gothic oddity, the whitewashed synagogue is topped with brick gables and its interior is starkly simple and little changed since the 13th century, with one prayer hall for the men and an adjoining gallery for women, who originally were only allowed to witness services from behind a glass screen. An elaborate wrought-iron grill encases the pulpit and the Torah scrolls are contained in a plain Ark on one wall. Apart from a couple of chandeliers, the only embellishment is a tattered red flag bearing the Star of David hanging from the ceiling, given as a gesture of respect to the Jewish community by the Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV in 1357; the red banner close by was a gift from Ferdinand III in thanks for Jewish help in repulsing a Swedish invasion in 1648. Down the centuries the building has survived fires, pogroms and sieges, giving rise to the legend that is protected by angels.

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Jan Palach Memorial (Památník Jana Palacha)

Jan Palach Memorial (Památník Jana Palacha)

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On Jan. 16, 1969, a student named Jan Palach set himself on fire in Wenceslas Square to protest the Soviet Union’s invasion of Czechoslovakia. Today, a truly unique memorial comprised of a horizontal weather-worn wooden cross rising up from cobblestone streets pays homage to Palach and his friend, Jan Zajic, who killed themselves as an act of political protest.

Today, visitors can stop at Jan Palach Memorial (Památník Jana Palacha) and reflect on the changes that have taken place in this Eastern European country. While travelers agree that the memorial isn’t well marked, or very well-explained, its significance in Czech history is great and certainly worth a visit.

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Golden Lane (Zlata Ulicka)

Golden Lane (Zlata Ulicka)

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Golden Lane (Zlata Ulicka) runs along the northern wall of Prague Castle and is one of the most famous and picturesque streets in the city. The lane and its miniature houses were built in the 15th century for castle guards but later housed artists and writers, including Franz Kafka.

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Petrin Tower (Petrínská Rozhledna)

Petrin Tower (Petrínská Rozhledna)

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Built in 1891 for the Czech Tourist Club’s General Land Centennial Exhibition, Petrin Tower (Petrínská Rozhledna) resembles a mini Eiffel Tower perched atop Petrin Hill. The highest point in Prague, with panoramic views, the landmark is popular with tourists who brave the 299 steps to get a bird’s-eye view of the city.

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Kampa Island

Kampa Island

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Kampa Park is on the west bank of the Vltava River in Prague. The park is famous for three giant baby sculptures designed by controversial artist David Cerny. Cerny purposely made his art with the intention to provoke people, and you can find his art throughout the city. He also made 10 other baby sculptures which can be seen crawling up the Zizkov TV Tower. The ones on the TV tower are made of fiberglass, but the ones in the park are bronze. The babies don't have normal faces. Instead they have alien-looking heads with long rectangular slots where the face should be.

The sculptures in the park were supposed to be part of a temporary exhibit, but they were so popular that they are now a permanent part of the scenery. They are located near the entrance to the Kampa Museum, which is the Museum of Modern Art from Central Europe.

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Letná Park (Letenské Sady)

Letná Park (Letenské Sady)

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Letná Park (Letenské Sady) is a large urban park built on Letná Hill, offering commanding views of Prague’s Old Town, including the Vltava River. It’s a popular place for skateboarders, rollerbladers, and cyclists, although the park is large enough that visitors can also relax with a picnic on its grassy areas or tree-lined avenue in peace.

Those looking for refreshment can stop for a drink in the popular beer garden here, which is always teeming with visitors during the summer months. For coffee and cake, or perhaps an evening meal, head to the Hanavský Pavilion; this cast-iron, pseudo-Baroque building was constructed at the end of the 19th century and provides some of the best views of the city from its terraces.

The giant arm of the Prague Metronome has been swinging back and forth in Letná Park since its construction in 1991. This unique monument sits on the site where a large statue of Joseph Stalin was erected in 1955. The statue was destroyed in 1962, and now the Metronome takes its place upon a marble plinth that was used as the base for the original monument.

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Terezín Memorial (Památník Terezín)

Terezín Memorial (Památník Terezín)

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A harrowing reminder of Europe’s dark history, the Terezin Concentration Camp once held prisoners awaiting transfer to Auschwitz and Treblinka. Today, the World War II site is preserved as the Terezín Memorial (Památník Terezín) and tells the horrifying truths of the Holocaust, as well as the stories of some of the 150,000 prisoners, including those who lost their lives.

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Prague Metronome (Prazský Metronom)

Prague Metronome (Prazský Metronom)

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Letná Park sits on high overlooking the Vltava River; it gives great views over the graceful Baroque spires of Prague’s Staré Město (Old Town), and is well know for its beer gardens, bars and picnic spots. The top of Letná Hill was once adorned with a 30-ft (9.2-m), 17,000-ton statue built in homage to Joseph Stalin, which was unveiled in 1955 while Bohemia was under Soviet rule. By 1962, however, Stalin had fallen from favor and his successor Nikita Khrushchev had the statue blown up. Its plinth was left empty for nearly 30 years, but eventually Czech artist Vratislav Novák designed and constructed a massive, functioning metronome and it was placed on the plinth in 1991. Today it is a well-loved landmark on Prague’s skyline.

Novák’s triangular metronome has a bright-red arm that is 75 ft (23 m) long and is clearly visible from Prague Castle as well as the river and its bridges below. The graffiti-strewn area immediately surrounding the metronome is popular as a skate park with the youth of the city, and it also serves as a viewing point and as a photographic backdrop for visitors on cycling, electric scooter and Segway tours of the city. At night the installation is illuminated and can be spotted after dark from boats cruising along the river.

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Powder Tower (Prasná Brána)

Powder Tower (Prasná Brána)

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The Powder Tower (Prasná Brána) is one of Prague’s last remaining city gates. It once formed part of the defensive walls that surrounded the city and was one of 13 gates that allowed people to pass in and out of the center. Visit to climb to the top of the tower and enjoy views over the surrounding area.

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Spanish Synagogue (Spanelská Synagoga)

Spanish Synagogue (Spanelská Synagoga)

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The Spanish Synagogue (Spanělská Synagoga) in Prague is the newest synagogue in the Jewish Town area. Ironically, it is built on the site of the 12th-century Altschul, which was thought to be the oldest synagogue in the city.

The current building was constructed in 1868. It was designed by Vojtěch Ignátz Ullmann in a neo-Moorish style, which was inspired by the art of the Arabic period of Spanish history – hence the synagogue’s name. The elaborate interior was designed by the architects, Antonín Baum and Bedřich Münzberger, and includes beautiful stained-glass windows and a stucco-covered ceiling of intricate stylized motifs, which also adorn the walls, doors, and gallery balustrades.

The Spanish Synagogue in Prague holds regular services, permanent and temporary exhibitions, classical concerts, and a variety of other programs and events.

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Estates Theatre (Stavovske Divadlo)

Estates Theatre (Stavovske Divadlo)

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The Estates Theatre (Stavovske Divadlo) is one of the most beautiful historical theaters in Europe. Built in less than two years, it opened in 1783, making it Prague's oldest theater. The site, known by locals as Stavoske divaldo,is famous for its connection with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who spent quite some time in Prague working on operas that would later be performed here. His Marriage of Figaro was played here in 1786, and the next year, Mozart personally conducted the world premiere of Don Giovanni in this space. Don Giovanni is still the theater's most prized opera performance.

While the building’s exterior has become an architectural icon, it’s the interior that leaves visitors truly breathless. Ornate gilded ceilings, glowing hallows of light and classically inspired design make the Estate Theatre’s environment almost as impressive as its performances.

Mozartissimo, a selection of Mozart's famous opera arias, as well as other shows and classical concerts are also performed throughout the year. The nation’s opera, ballet and theater groups all utilize this stately space to bring their craft to the country’s people, and travelers have been finding their way to the stage in search of a true taste of Czech culture for decades.

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