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Things to Do in Spain

Sandwiched between Portugal to the west and France to the northeast, Spain entices visitors with its rich culture, history, and fabulous cuisine. The sun shines almost all year round; locals pass down traditional tapas recipes through the generations; and people greet each other with warmth and affection. Whether you visit for the food, the weather, the coast, or the history, Spain brims with adventures, all of which can be easily accessed by a host of private and small-group tours. In vibrant Barcelona and Madrid, walking and cycling tours lead you to top attractions such as the Prado National Museum and Gaudí’s iconic La Sagrada Familia, and offer skip-the-line access as well as a guide to bring Spain’s history to life. Food and wine-tasting tours and cooking classes teach you how tapas delicacies such as Iberian ham, salted cod, and rich chickpea stew complement Spanish reds and whites like Rioja, Montenovo Godello, and Serrana Macabeo. History buffs can explore medieval streets around Besalú, Tavertet, and Rupit on a group tour to see where castle ruins hide among rugged cliffs and dense forests; while culture vultures will want to take in the passion of flamenco, a traditional Spanish dance. Multi-day tours take travelers to far-flung destinations like Cordoba, Granada, Ronda, Seville, Toledo, and the beautiful coast east of Malaga, where ancient olive groves thrive in the Spanish sunshine.
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Sagrada Família
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La Sagrada Familia is no doubt the most iconic structure in Barcelona. The church, located in L'Eixample, has been a fixture in Barcelona since construction commenced in 1882 and as building continues on today the structure's fame only grows.

Though still a work in progress, the church already is an amazingly intricate structure. Antoni Gaudí spent 43 years on this project and, since his death in 1926, the duty to finish it has been passed on to several architects. Though the responsibility continues to change hands over the years, the architects have all respected Gaudí's vision and have made additions with his design in mind. Inside the church has an impressive stained glass windows line the main room and a lift takes visitors up one of the towers to enjoy the view. Smaller rooms hold exhibits detailing the history and future of the structure. La Sagrada Familia is projected to be completed in 2026, the 100th anniversary of Gaudí.

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Corral de la Morería
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As one of Spain’s most famous tablaos (flamenco clubs), the Corral de la Morería in Madrid has been producing flamboyant and moving flamenco performances for nearly 60 years. Thanks to its reputation, the Corral de la Morería attracts its fair share of world-renowned dancers as well as the occasional A-List celebrity spotted among the audience.

With seating around individual tables for a capacity of just 140, the club feels intimate and cozy, furnished in simple rustic style and with great views of the small stage from all sides. With two shows lasting over an hour every night, each featuring 11 performers, revered names from the world of flamenco who have danced their wild, passionate flamenco here include Blanca del Rey and Antonio Gades. The current artistic director, Blanca del Rey, has also received many awards for the stunning choreography of the flamenco shows.

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Barcelona Cruise Port
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Welcome to the vibrant Catalan capital, Barcelona! With its laid-back Mediterranean setting, exciting Modernist architecture and labyrinthine Gothic Quarter, Barcelona has enough shore excursions and activities to keep you bar-hopping and sightseeing for days.

Barcelona’s cruise terminals are clustered in historic Port Vell at the foot of Las Ramblas, Barcelona’s most famous thoroughfare. It’s a 10 to 30-minute walk to Las Ramblas and the Gothic Quarter. Most visitors catch a shuttle bus to the iconic Christopher Columbus statue, a minute’s stroll from Las Ramblas. A quick taxi ride to the Gothic Quarter takes only 10 minutes from the port.

It’s de rigueur to take a stroll along tree-lined Las Ramblas, with its flower stalls and singing birds. Drop into Barcelona’s historic market for tapas and champagne, then follow winding streets through the Gothic Quarter to the centuries-old cathedral.

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Zocodover Square (Plaza de Zocodover)
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Your first proper stop in Toledo may very well be the city’s main plaza, Plaza de Zocodover, as it receives visitors not far from the northern entrance to the city. The plaza has served as Toledo’s main square for pretty much all of the city’s history, and has been the site of bullfights, executions, and an important market for which the plaza was named.

Indeed, the word Zocodover has Arabic origins, meaning mercado de las bestias de carga, or, loosely, livestock market. That’s because, during those times, the plaza was home to a regular market that sold animals such as horses and donkeys. These days, apart from being one of the city’s biggest tourist attractions, the plaza also hosts concerts and events, thus continuing to be the center of local life.

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Alhambra (Alhambra de Granada)
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The Alhambra is not only Spain’s greatest architectural treasure, but one of the world’s wonders. It might not wow you right up front like a Taj Mahal or a Great Pyramid, but soon enough that austere exterior reveals a wonderland of musical fountains, cunningly devised gardens and finely carved palaces. Its construction was begun in the 11th century on the red hill known as Assabika, which overlooks Granada. The Alcazaba fortress was the first structure to be built, followed by the royal palace and residence of members of the court.
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Gothic Quarter (Barri Gotic)
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Barcelona's Gothic Quarter (Barri Gótic) dates from medieval times. On the streets, passersby find gems tucked away in the little nooks and crannies.. The area's proximity to La Rambla also contributes to its popularity amongst the young, nightlife-loving crowd. Meeting with friends in one of the several placas (plazas) before heading to dinner or a club is customary amongst the locals.

Besides the thriving night scene, there is plenty to see during the daylight hours. Highlights of the Barri Gótic include Barcelona's cathedral, the political hub of Placa Sant Jaume, and some of Barcelona's best surviving stretches of the Roman walls. Full of history, mystery and culture, this district of Barcelona is worth at least a full day on every vacationer's itinerary.

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Catalunya Square (Plaça de Catalunya)
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Strategically located at the meeting point of La Rambla and Passeig de Gràcia, two of Barcelona’s busiest boulevards, Catalunya Square (Plaça de Catalunya) makes a strategic starting point for walking tours of the city. More than just a navigational landmark, Catalunya Square is also the symbolic heart of Barcelona and the large, tree-lined plaza is abuzz with activity both day and night.

As well as being surrounded by restaurants, cafes and bars, including the iconic Cafe Zurich and the Hard Rock Café, Catalunya Square is also home to large department stores like El Corte Inglés, FNAC and Habitat, a pair of dramatically illuminated fountains and a number of monumental sculptures, including the white marble La Deessa by Josep Clara and Josep Subirachs’s Monument of Francesc Macià.

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Royal Palace of Madrid (Palacio Real de Madrid)
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The Palacio Real (or Royal Palace, also referred to as the Palacio de Oriente) is the lavish site of royal events, but is not home to the royal family (they have lived in the smaller Palacio de la Zarzuela for some time).

The Palacio Real is still a fascinating place to walk through though, with its maze of 50 themed rooms decorated in the finest metals and richest fabrics - though this is only a small sampling of the total 2,800 rooms of the palace. On the guided tour, you will also learn much about the interesting history behind the Bourbon dynasty, during whose reign the palace was most in use.

Highlights of the tour include the throne room, the immense staircase, the collection of suits of armor and the peculiar royal pharmacy, filled with all sorts of strange concoctions.

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Famara Beach (Playa de Famara)
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A 1.8-mile-long stretch of golden sand fringed by soaring sea cliffs, the picturesque setting of Famara Beach (Playa de Famara) has earned it a legion of fans, among them renowned local artist César Manrique and Spanish filmmaker Pedro Almodóvar. The dramatic surroundings make the beach extremely popular among locals, and there are ample opportunities for exploring, like walking in the sand dunes, hiking across the cliff tops of El Risco (Lanzarote’s highest peak) or tucking into fresh seafood in the traditional fishing village of Caleta de Famara.

Benefiting from consistent winds and world-class reef breaks, the beach is also a hot spot for water sports, with popular activities including surfing, windsurfing and kiteboarding, as well as hang-gliding from the coastal cliffs.

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More Things to Do in Spain

Plaza Mayor

Plaza Mayor

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Plaza Mayor is a large square in central Madrid. It serves today as a meeting place for tourists and locals alike, and has played host to a variety of festivities throughout history, including bull fights, soccer matches, and executions during the Spanish Inquisition.

The plaza was built in the early 17th century during King Felipe III's reign - the central statue is a nod to him overseeing the project's completion. Forming the outer walls are a series of three-story residential buildings with balconies overlooking the center, providing excellent views of the action below.

The most prominent of the buildings in the plaza is the Casa de la Panaderia - House of the Baker's Guild, which today serves municipal and cultural functions. There are also several shops and eateries that occupy the ground level of the buildings and provide refreshments for hungry and thirsty travelers admiring the square.

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El Arenal District

El Arenal District

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Snuggled up against the Guadalqivir River’s east bank and set amidst some of Seville’s most storied streets, you’ll wander upon El Arenal. Its name (arena means sand in Spanish) tells the story of its past, when, during the 16th and 17th centuries, the sandy-banked neighborhood was used as Seville’s port, making it one of the most important port cities in the world. From its shore, boats set off west for the New World, or east for spices, and returned with grand treasures.

These days, the neighborhood, which sits within the city's historic quarter, is especially known for its residents' passion for bullfighting and also religion. Their faithfulness is evident in the abundance of Arenal brotherhoods, whose devotion can be seen during Holy Week each year, when Seville’s Catholicism comes to life in colorful processions that take over the city streets.

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Montjuïc Castle (Castell de Montjuïc)

Montjuïc Castle (Castell de Montjuïc)

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Looming over Barcelona city center from the 170-meter summit of Montjuïc Mountain, the forbidding Montjuïc Castle, or Castell de Montjuïc, adds a dramatic silhouette to the city skyline. Reachable via cable car from the Montjuic Funicular station, the 17th-century fortress is most popular as a lookout point and the Cami del Mar walking track affords spectacular panoramic views over the city, the distant mountains and along the Mediterranean coast.

Behind the castle’s majestic façade lies a grim and gruesome history, used mostly during the late 19th and 20th centuries to house and execute political prisoners. Anarchists, fascists and Republicans have all met their maker within these walls, most famously Lluis Companys, the President of Catalunya who was executed here by firing squad in 1940.

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Park Güell

Park Güell

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Park Güell is known as one of Gaudí's most colorful works and its expansive display of this artist's playful architecture is what makes it one of Barcelona's top attractions. While the park was originally meant to be a housing development for rich socialites, when the wealthy decided not to move to the hilltop, it became a public playground.

Gaudí spent the first 15 years of the 20th century constructing the numerous fountains, pedestrian walkways and benches in his signature style that are still enjoyed by visitors today. One of the most popular spots in the park is at the top of the hill, where from brightly colored mosaic seats you can take in the panoramic view over Barcelona city and capture some great photos of the park.

Another must-see attraction in Park Güell is the Gaudí House Museum. This pink house near the base of the park is where Gaudí spent the last two decades of his life and it is filled with furniture and other works designed by the artist.

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Passeig de Gracia

Passeig de Gracia

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Passeig de Gracia is one of the most significant avenues in Barcelona. In addition to being home to some of the most celebrated architecture in the city, it is considered to be the most expensive street in all of Spain. Originally known as Carni de Jesus, the avenue began as a rural lane connecting Barcelona with the then-independent town of Gracia. Pursuant to an urbanization project in the 1820s, it was transformed into a wide avenue that eventually became a favorite of aristocrats. Today, it is a popular tourist destination, both for its architecture and for its shopping.

By the early 1900s, Passeig de Gracia featured homes designed by notable art nouveau/modernista architects such as Antonin Gaudi, Pere Falques, Josep Puig i Cadafalch, Lluis Domenech i Montaner and Josep Vilaseca.

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Columbus Monument (Mirador de Colom)

Columbus Monument (Mirador de Colom)

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Some shorelines have lighthouses; Barcelona has the Columbus Monument. Standing 197 feet tall — the top 24 feet of which make up the statue of Columbus himself — the tower is quite hard to miss, especially given its prominent position at the end of Las Ramblas, and along the marina.The monument of Columbus (Colom in Catalan, or Colón in Spanish) was erected in 1888 for the Universal Exposition and in honor of the famous explorer, who returned here after his first expedition to the Americas. Much discussion is made of where he is pointing: some have thought he points to the New World, while others say he points east to his supposed home of Genoa — in reality, however, it seems he points southeast and therefore to nothing in particular but the sea, where he was probably most at home. On your visit here, admire the grand statue from below, or get a look at Columbus’s bird’s-eye view by taking the elevator up to the lookout platform.

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Maremagnum

Maremagnum

24 Tours and Activities

Framed by its wave-shaped walkway leading from the city out onto the water, Maremagnum is recognizable from many sections of the Barcelona beaches. The shopping center is home to many big name brands, as well as local restaurants and a cinema. Two floors of shops range from home goods and electronics to clothing and jewelry. You’ll also find Spanish brands such as Desigual, and other European retailers.

Many of the cafes and restaurants are open-air, making them especially nice on a sunny day. People come to leisurely watch boats pull in and out of the nearby port and absorb a bit of the Barcelona waterfront. The structure itself, like many of the buildings in Barcelona, is unique and well-designed. Its curved, mirrored walls reflect the light off of the nearby water and make an interesting contrast to the natural wooden pier. Walking down the central boulevard, Las Ramblas, toward the ocean will lead you straight there.

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Generalife Gardens

Generalife Gardens

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The Generalife was built as a summer palace for the Muslim emirs, a place of retreat where they could kick back with their harems and take some time away from the world. Its charming gardens – undoubtedly the highlight of the Generalife - are still a prime place to do just that. Generalife Gardens are designed for tranquility, with everywhere the trickle of running water cooling the senses. Tall cypresses frame pathways, fountains play in arches over long pools, streams flow down staircases, flowers and flowering trees cast their scent, and hedges enclose serene little lawns. The sultana’s garden, with its ancient cypress trunk, was where one sultan’s wife trysted with her lover (and was caught, precipitating bloodshed – hard to believe as you stand in this artful paradise).
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Mt. Teide (El Teide)

Mt. Teide (El Teide)

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Towering 3,718 m over the island of Tenerife, scaling the high-altitude peak of Spain’s highest mountain can be, quite literally, breathtaking. Thankfully, you don’t have to climb the summit to take in the views from Mount Teide – the Teide Cable Car whisks visitors to an observation deck at 3,550m, where you can enjoy dramatic views that span as far as the neighboring Canary Islands on clear days. It’s also possible to hike to the lookout point, a taxing climb that takes around 5 hours, but to scale the final 200m to the highest point, climbers need to secure a free permit from the National Park office.

Set in an ancient caldera at the center of the UNESCO World Heritage listed Teide National Park, the Mount Teide volcano dates back around 1 million years and ranks as the 3rd highest volcano in the world, rising 7,500 m above the ocean floor. Although the volcano hasn’t erupted since 1909, it remains active and seismic activity was recorded as recently as 2003.

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Barceloneta Beach

Barceloneta Beach

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Few cities do urban beaches with as much panache as Barcelona and with 4.2 km of sandy coastline, there are plenty of options to choose from. The most popular is the Barceloneta Beach, an easy bus ride from the city center and crammed with locals and tourists during the summer months.

Whether you’re looking to escape the city heat, top up your suntan or take a dip in the cool Mediterranean, Barceloneta has plenty of options to keep beach-goers busy. Sip a sangria at one of the many chiringuitos (beach bars) along the waterfront, join the locals in a game of beach tennis or volleyball; or explore the souvenir stores and cafés crammed along the beachside Passeig Maritim boulevard. Active types can enjoy water sports like surfing, windsurfing and kite surfing or hit the lively boardwalk – a popular spot for walkers, joggers and cyclists.

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Puerta del Sol

Puerta del Sol

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As the central hub of Madrid, the Puerta del Sol makes a popular starting point for sightseeing tours of the city, with a vast number of hotels, hostels and tourist apartments lying on or near the plaza. The famous public square, laid out in its current form back in the 1850s, was once the site of the city’s gates, whose sun emblem gave the area its name – Puerta del Sol translates to ‘the Gate of the Sun.' Not only is the square a key navigational landmark but it’s also home to a number of iconic sights. The 18th century Real Casa de Correos is best known for its monumental clock tower – the city’s principal timekeeper and the centerpiece of the city’s lively New Year’s Eve celebrations – and by its entrance lies the famous Kilometer Zero stone, the official starting point for Spain’s 6 National Roads, laid out in 1950. Take a moment by the legendary stone to ponder the square’s turbulent history - the 1766 Esquilache Mutiny, the 1808 resistance against Napoleon’s troops and the 1812
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El Born

El Born

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A small corner of Barcelona's Cuitat Vella, or Old City, El Born lies just south of La Ribera, close to the city’s coastal ports. With its narrow streets and historic squares teeming with cafés, El Born is full of character and a perfect place to escape the bustle of the city’s more touristy areas.

The tree-lined Passeig del Born is at the heart of the district, casting off its origins as a medieval jousting arena in favor of a modern shopping and nightlife hub, presided over by the imposing façade of the gothic St Mary of the Sea Cathedral. A cosmopolitan blend of locals and tourists fill the square’s many tapas restaurants, cocktail lounges and chic wine bars during the evening hours, making it the perfect place to unwind after a day’s sightseeing or catch up with friends in some of the city’s most fashionable haunts.

El Born also houses some of the city’s key attractions, most significantly the Parc de la Ciutadella, or Ciutadella Park.

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Barcelona Cathedral (Catedral de Barcelona)

Barcelona Cathedral (Catedral de Barcelona)

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Standing tall over a medieval square in the center of Barcelona’s Gothic Quarter, the Barcelona Cathedral (known formally as the Cathedral of the Holy Cross and Saint Eulalia, or La Seu) is the seat of the Archbishop of Spain and a major landmark of the city. With octagonal bell towers, five aisles and two chapel areas, the hall church has stood since the 13th century. It is dedicated to Saint Eulalia, a patron saint of Barcelona, whose body is entombed in the crypt. Large, colorful stained glass windows look over twenty eight total small chapels inside.

The Cathedral is known for its 14th-century cloister full of palm trees and a lush garden, as well as a massive Gothic portico under which thirteen geese can be found wandering. Each goose represents a year of the life of the young Saint Eulalia. As for the exterior, it is carved in great Gothic style detail — and is particularly beautiful when illuminated at night.

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Gran Vía

Gran Vía

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Meaning "Great Road", Gran Vía is a main thoroughfare in Madrid, built to connect Calle de Alcalá to Plaza de España. Lined with a mixture of high end shops, eateries, and bars that cover both ends of the spectrum, this lively bustling street is best enjoyed at night when the locals and tourists alike come out to eat, drink, and mingle into the wee hours of the morning. Besides the shopping and nightlife scene, Gran Vía is best known for the 20th century architecture that creates landmarks along its way. One such example is the Edificio Metropolis, which stands at the head of Gran Vía and boasts a magnificent rooftop statue of the Goddess Victory. There are also several old movie theatres including the Capitol, built in the art deco style.
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